Rafael Pass

Professor

Department of Computer Science

Cornell University and Cornell Tech

 

 

Ph.D, MIT, 2006

first name at cs.cornell.edu

 

Cornell Tech, 2 W Loop Rd

New York, NY 10044

 

 

Summary

I am a Professor at Cornell Tech.and in the Department of Computer Science at Cornell University.
I obtained my Ph.D in 2006 in the
Theory of Computation group at MIT with Silvio Micali as advisor.
Previously, I completed my Licentiate Thesis (M.S.) under the supervision of
Johan Hastad.

My research focuses on Cryptography and its interplay with Computational Complexity and Game Theory; lately, I have become increasingly interested in the theoretical foundations of blockchains, and even more recently on connections between Cryptography and Kolmogorov complexity.
My work has been supported by a NSF Career Award, a Microsoft Faculty Fellowship, an AFOSR Young Investigator Award, an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellowship, a Wallenberg Academy Award, a Google Faculty Award, a JP Morgan Faculty award, as well as grants from AFOSR, BSF, DARPA and IARPA.

 

During 2021-2022, I am an IAS Distinguished Scholar at the Institute for Advanced Study (IAS) at Tel-Aviv University.

 

My CV: pdf

 

Books/Lecture Notes

 

Projects

 

Teaching

 

Current Ph.D. Students

Graduated Ph.D. Students

 

Current and Previous Post Docs

 

Program Commitees

 

Some on-line papers  (see DBLP for a complete list)

 

Recent Manuscript:

 

2021

 

 

2020

 

 

2019

 

 

2018

 

Andrew Morgan, Rafael Pass pdf

Kai-Min Chung , Yue Guo, Wei-Kai Lin, Rafael Pass, Elaine Shi pdf

 

 

2017

Adam Bjorndahl, Joseph Y. Halpern, Rafael Pass pdf

 

2016

 

2015

 

2014

 

2013

 

2012

 

2011

2010

 

2009

2008

 

2007

2006

2005

2004

2003



This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation, AFOSR, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, BSF,

Sloan Foundation, IBM and Microsoft. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publications are those of
the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the NSF, AFOSR, DHS, BSF, Sloan Foundation, IBM or Microsoft.