In “How to Argue on the Internet Without Losing Your Mind,” Kristin Wong invokes two papers whose authors include current Computer Science and Information Science faculty; Cornell CS undergraduate and Ph.D. alumni; and former a CS postdoc.

With the subtitle “avoid the murky waters of trolldom,” Wong cites:

1. “Anyone Can Become a Troll: Causes of Trolling Behavior in Online Discussions,” whose first author, Justin Cheng, received his BS from Cornell CS in 2012; third author, Cristian Danescu-Niculescu-Mizil, is an Assistant Professor of Information Science; and fourth author, Jure Leskovec, is a former Cornell postdoc.

Citation: Justin Cheng, Michael Bernstein, Cristian Danescu-Niculescu-Mizil, and Jure Leskovec. 2017. Anyone Can Become a Troll: Causes of Trolling Behavior in Online Discussions. In Proceedings of the 2017 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Social Computing (CSCW '17). ACM, New York, NY, USA, 1217-1230. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2998181.2998213

Wong also cites:

2. “Winning Arguments: Interaction Dynamics and Persuasion Strategies in Good-faith Online Discussions,” who first author, Chenhao Tan, earned a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Cornell in 2016; second author, Vlad Niculae, received a Ph.D. in Computer Science from Cornell in 2018; third author, Cristian Danescu-Niculescu-Mizil, is an Assistant Professor of Information Science; and fourth author, Lillian Lee, is a Professor of Computer Science.

Citation: Chenhao Tan, Vlad Niculae, Cristian Danescu-Niculescu-Mizil, and Lillian Lee. 2016. Winning Arguments: Interaction Dynamics and Persuasion Strategies in Good-faith Online Discussions. In Proceedings of the 25th International Conference on World Wide Web (WWW '16). International World Wide Web Conferences Steering Committee, Republic and Canton of Geneva, Switzerland, 613-624. DOI: https://doi.org/10.1145/2872427.2883081