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Emacspeak User's Manual --2nd Edition.

This manual documents Emacspeak, a speech interface to Emacs. The manual is divided into the following chapters.

1. Copyright  
2. Announcing Emacspeak Manual 2nd Edition As An Open Source Project  
3. Introduction  
4. Installation Instructions  
5. Basic Usage.  
6. The Emacspeak Audio Desktop.  
7. Using Online Help With Emacspeak.  
8. Emacs Packages.  
9. Running Terminal Based Applications  
10. Emacspeak Commands  
11. Acknowledgements.  

Indices:

12. Concept Index  
13. Key Index  

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1. Copyright

This manual documents Emacspeak, a speech extension to Emacs.

Copyright (C)1994 -- 2002 T. V. Raman All Rights Reserved.

Permission is granted to make and distribute verbatim copies of this manual without charge provided the copyright notice and this permission notice are preserved on all copies.


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2. Announcing Emacspeak Manual 2nd Edition As An Open Source Project

This is to announce the launch of a new open source project to create a user manual for Emacspeak --an Emacs speech extension that provides a complete audio desktop.

2.1 How To Contribute To This Manual  
2.2 Authoring Guidelines  
2.3 Credits  


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2.1 How To Contribute To This Manual

This manual is organized as a series of chapters, with each chapter in a separate file. If you feel capable of contributing to a specific section, send out a message to the Emacspeak mailing list emacspeak@cs.vassar.edu. You can then start adding content to a local copy of the chapter to which you are contributing. When you feel you have something to submit, mail out the file to the emacspeak mailing list-- I'll integrate new content as it comes in.


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2.2 Authoring Guidelines

For this manual to hang together and make sense to the new user at whom it is targetted, contributors need to stick to a consistent style. If you plan to contribute content, you should take some time to read the existing sections --note that many of these are skeletal and the first contributions will be to flesh these sections out.

If you are familiar with texinfo, go ahead and mark up your content using texinfo. If you are not, simply author the documentation you create as plain formatted ASCII. If you do submit files as texinfo source, make sure to validate them at your end first by running the files through makeinfo --badly created or malformed texinfo source takes more time to fix than marking up straight text.


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2.3 Credits

This initial version draws heavily from the original Emacspeak user manual, and includes contributions from Jim Van Zandt and Jason White. Authors who contribute complete sections will be acknowledged here as well as in the specific section they author.


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3. Introduction

Emacspeak provides a complete audio desktop by speech-enabling all of Emacs.

In the past, screen reading programs have allowed visually impaired users to get feedback using synthesized speech. Such programs have been commercially available for well over a decade. Most of them run on PC's under DOS, and these are now moving over to the Windows environment. However, screen-readers for the UNIX environment have been conspicuous in their absence. Note that this is now changing with the availability of console-level Linux screenreaders such as speakup. Such Linux screenreaders provide the same level of UNIX accessibility provided in the late 80's by PC terminal emulators running a DOS screenreader. This means that most visually impaired computer users face the additional handicap of being DOS-impaired -- a far more serious problem:-)

Emacspeak is an emacs subsystem that provides complete speech access. It is not a screen-reader --rather, it is a complete user environment with built-in speech feedback. Emacspeak has a significant advantage; since it runs inside Emacs, a structure-sensitive, fully customizable environment, Emacspeak has more context-specific information about what it is speaking than its screenreader counterparts. This is why Emacspeak is not a "screenreader", it is a subsystem that produces speech output.

A Traditional screen-reader speaks the content of the screen, leaving it to the user to interpret the visual layout. Emacspeak, on the other hand, treats speech as a first-class output modality; it speaks the information in a manner that is easy to comprehend when listening.

The basic concepts used by Emacspeak are simple; all interactive Emacs commands have been adapted to provide speech feedback. Hence, you use Emacs as normal; Emacspeak works behind the scene to give audio feedback in addition to updating the screen.

Emacspeak consists of a core speech system that provides speech and audio services to the rest of the Emacspeak desktop; application-specific extensions provide context-specific spoken feedback using these services. Emacspeak currently comes with speech extensions for several popular Emacs subsystems and editing modes. I would like to thank their respective authors for their wonderful work which makes Emacs more than a text editor(1)..


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4. Installation Instructions

This chapter gives brief and detailed installation instructions for configuring, installing and starting Emacspeak.

4.1 Obtaining Emacspeak  
4.2 Quick Installation  Default installation and startup.
4.3 Configuring and Installing Emacspeak  Configuring and Installing Emacspeak and its associated files


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4.1 Obtaining Emacspeak

Emacspeak is available on the Internet at:

WWW
http://emacspeak.sf.net
WWW
http://www.cs.cornell.edu/home/raman/emacspeak/
FTP
ftp://ftp.cs.cornell.edu/pub/raman/emacspeak
Mail List
emacspeak@cs.vassar.edu
List Request
emacspeak-request@cs.vassar.edu

The Emacspeak mailing list is maintained by Greg E. Priest-Dorman. If you are using Emacspeak, you can join the list by sending mail to the request address.


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4.2 Quick Installation

Here are the quick installation instructions. See the next section for detailed installation instructions.

Prepackaged RPM files are available on the Emacspeak site. Packages for other Linux distributions such as Debian typically become available on the WWW a few days after a new version is released. The instructions below are for building and installing Emacspeak from the source distribution.


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4.3 Configuring and Installing Emacspeak

Note: You need GNU Emacs 20.2 or later for using newer versions of Emacspeak.

The speech server for the Dectalk is written in TclX. (For example, see the source file `dtk-exp').

Configure the source files by typing `make config'. At this point you can check that the speech server is correctly configured by typing
 
tcl dtk-exp
(assuming you are using the Dectalk Express). You should hear the Dectalk speak and get a TCL prompt if everything is okay.

If you're feeling paranoid, you can perform a couple of additional tests at this point. Execute the following commands in the running tcl session you just started above. (Most users will not need to do this; it is a sanity check and is useful in tracking problems, especially if you find emacspeak beginning to talk and then immediately fall silent.)

Quit this TCL session by typing C-D.

Next, compile the elisp files by typing
 
make emacspeak
Finally, install the documentation and executable files by typing
 
make PREFIX=<prefix> install 

The speech server program and/or output port can also be specified at run time by setting the shell environment variables DTK_PROGRAM and DTK_PORT. Examples: If using csh or tcsh
 
setenv DTK_PROGRAM "dtk-exp"
if using sh or bash
 
DTK_PROGRAM=dtk-exp
export DTK_PROGRAM
Similarly,
 
DTK_PORT=/dev/ttyS0

You can always set these variables from a running Emacs session by executing the Emacs setenv command.


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5. Basic Usage.

This chapter gives an overview of how to use Emacspeak. Note: This documentation should be used in conjunction with the online Emacs info pages that extensively document Emacs itself. These sections briefly describe the speech-enabling extensions. However, they should not be considered a substitute for reading the Emacs manual. How successfully you use Emacspeak will depend on how well you learn your Emacs.

All Emacs navigation and editing commands have been speech enabled. Thus, moving to the next or previous word, line or paragraph results in the text around point being spoken. Exactly how much text is spoken is determined by the amount by which you moved.

In addition, Emacspeak provides basic reading functions that can be invoked to listen to chunks of text without moving.

5.1 Overview of Emacspeak  Basic Overview.
5.2 Working In Emacs Buffers.  Working in Emacspeak.
5.3 Reading Without Moving The Cursor.  Reading chunks of information.
5.4 Speech System Commands  Controlling Speech Output.
5.5 Voice Lock Mode  Audio Formatting.
5.6 Commands For Speaking Status Information.  Speaking Status Information.


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5.1 Overview of Emacspeak

Emacspeak provides a small number of core services around which the remainder of the audio interface is constructed. These essential features of the software are briefly outlined in the following paragraphs; the commands by which they can be controlled will be described later in the manual.

Apart from providing a fluent spoken interface to all of Emacs' basic editing functions, Emacspeak also includes software modules which add speech feedback to a range of applications that can be run from within Emacs. In this sense, Emacspeak amounts to much more than a talking text editor; indeed, it can more aptly be characterized as a true "audio desktop", in which speech is treated as a first-class output modality.

Emacspeak implements a special minor mode, known as "voice lock mode" (see section 5.5 Voice Lock Mode) which uses distinct speech characteristics to provide aural highlighting of specific textual constructs, such as comments in program code, quoted strings and reserved words. This facility is further extended when Emacspeak is used with the W3 World Wide Web browser, to enable the semantic and structural distinctions captured by the HTML markup to be communicated efficiently.

It is often desirable to exercise control over the pronunciation of a word (E.G. a technical term or a reserved word in a programming language) within specific contexts. Emacspeak maintains pronunciation dictionaries for this purpose, which may be customized by the user. Moreover, individual dictionaries can be activated selectively, depending for example on the current major mode or the name of the file which is being visited.

In addition to spoken feedback, Emacspeak can generate "auditory icons"---short sound cues which alert the user to significant events, for example the opening or deletion of a file, the completion of an action, the arrival of an electronic mail message or the creation of a completion buffer. Sound cues act as a supplement to the spoken interface, and are especially valuable to the experienced user in facilitating rapid interaction. Note that in order to support auditory icons, the computer must be equipped with sound hardware for which the operating system has been correctly configured.


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5.2 Working In Emacs Buffers.

While typing in an Emacs buffer, hitting space speaks the recently typed word. I use completion all the time; so Emacspeak will speak the completion just inserted as well as the next possible completion. In Emacs, use load-library ret completion ret for loading the completion package.

The standard Emacs prompting functions have also been speech-enabled. Emacs prompts with available lists of completions in response to partial input wherever appropriate --all forms of completion provide speech feedback.

In addition, Emacspeak provides a number of commands for reading portions of the current buffer, getting status information, and modifying Emacspeak's state.

All of the commands are documented in the subsequent sections. They can be classified into types:

Emacs has extensive online help; so does emacspeak. Please use it.

This info manual is only to get you started. You can get a summary of Emacspeak's features by pressing Control-h Control-e


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5.3 Reading Without Moving The Cursor.

Emacspeak speaks information as you move around within a buffer. How much text is spoken depends on how you move, thus, when you move by words, you hear the current word; when you move by paragraphs, you hear the current paragraph spoken. In addition, the following commands allow you to listen to information without moving point (point is emacs terminology for the editing cursor).

Reading without moving point:

control e c
emacspeak-speak-char Speak character under point. Pronounces character phonetically unless called with a PREFIX arg.

control e w
emacspeak-speak-word Speak current word. With prefix ARG, speaks the rest of the word from point. Negative prefix arg speaks from start of word to point. If executed on the same buffer position a second time, the word is spelt instead of being spoken.

control e l
emacspeak-speak-line Speaks current line. With prefix ARG, speaks the rest of the line from point. Negative prefix optional arg speaks from start of line to point. Voicifies if option `voice-lock-mode' is on. Indicates indentation with a tone if audio indentation is in use. Indicates position of point with an aural highlight if option `emacspeak-show-point' is turned on --see command `emacspeak-show-point' bound to M-x emacspeak-show-point. Lines that start hidden blocks of text, e.g. outline header lines, or header lines of blocks created by command `emacspeak-hide-or-expose-block' are indicated with auditory icon ellipses.

control e up
emacspeak-read-previous-line Read previous line, specified by an offset, without moving. Default is to read the previous line.

control e down
emacspeak-read-next-line Read next line, specified by an offset, without moving. Default is to read the next line.

control e {
emacspeak-speak-paragraph Speak paragraph. With prefix arg, speaks rest of current paragraph. Negative prefix arg will read from start of current paragraph to point. If voice-lock-mode is on, then it will use any defined personality.

control e r
emacspeak-speak-region Speak current region delimited by point and mark. When called from a program, argument START and END specify region to speak.

control e cap R
emacspeak-speak-rectangle Speak a rectangle of text. Rectangle is delimited by point and mark. When call from a program, arguments specify the START and END of the rectangle.

control e b
emacspeak-speak-buffer Speak current buffer contents. With prefix ARG, speaks the rest of the buffer from point. Negative prefix arg speaks from start of buffer to point. If voice lock mode is on, the paragraphs in the buffer are voice annotated first, see command `emacspeak-speak-voice-annotate-paragraphs'.

control e n
emacspeak-speak-rest-of-buffer Speak remainder of the buffer starting at point

control e /
emacspeak-speak-this-buffer-other-window-display Speak this buffer as displayed in a different frame. Emacs allows you to display the same buffer in multiple windows or frames. These different windows can display different portions of the buffer. This is equivalent to leaving a book open at places at once. This command allows you to listen to the places where you have left the book open. The number used to invoke this command specifies which of the displays you wish to speak. Typically you will have two or at most three such displays open. The current display is 0, the next is 1, and so on. Optional argument ARG specifies the display to speak.

control e left
emacspeak-speak-this-buffer-previous-display Speak this buffer as displayed in a `previous' window. See documentation for command `emacspeak-speak-this-buffer-other-window-display' for the meaning of `previous'.

control e right
emacspeak-speak-this-buffer-next-display Speak this buffer as displayed in a `previous' window. See documentation for command `emacspeak-speak-this-buffer-other-window-display' for the meaning of `previous'.

control e [
emacspeak-speak-page Speak a page. With prefix ARG, speaks rest of current page. Negative prefix arg will read from start of current page to point. If option `voice-lock-mode' is on, then it will use any defined personality.

control e 9 control e 8 control e 7 control e 6 control e 5 control e 4 control e 3 control e 2 control e 1 control e 0
emacspeak-speak-predefined-window Speak one of the first 10 windows on the screen. In general, you'll never have Emacs split the screen into more than two or three. Argument ARG determines the 'other' window to speak. Speaks entire window irrespective of point. Semantics of `other' is the same as for the builtin Emacs command `other-window'.

control e control n
emacspeak-speak-next-window Speak the next window.

control e control p
emacspeak-speak-previous-window Speak the previous window.

control e control o
emacspeak-speak-other-window Speak contents of `other' window. Speaks entire window irrespective of point. Semantics of `other' is the same as for the builtin Emacs command `other-window'. Optional argument ARG specifies `other' window to speak.

ESCAPE up
emacspeak-owindow-previous-line Move to the next line in the other window and speak it. Numeric prefix arg COUNT specifies number of lines to move.

ESCAPE down
emacspeak-owindow-next-line Move to the next line in the other window and speak it. Numeric prefix arg COUNT can specify number of lines to move.

ESCAPE next
emacspeak-owindow-scroll-up Scroll up the window that command `other-window' would move to. Speak the window contents after scrolling.

ESCAPE prior
emacspeak-owindow-scroll-down Scroll down the window that command `other-window' would move to. Speak the window contents after scrolling.

control e '
emacspeak-speak-sexp Speak current sexp. With prefix ARG, speaks the rest of the sexp from point. Negative prefix arg speaks from start of sexp to point. If option `voice-lock-mode' is on, then uses the personality.

control e meta control @
emacspeak-speak-spaces-at-point Speak the white space at point.


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5.4 Speech System Commands

This section documents Emacspeak's various user commands for controlling the text to speech (TTS) system.

5.4.1 Character, Word And Line Echo.  Character, Word and Line Echo.
5.4.2 Setting Various Characteristics Of Speech Output.  Indicating case, capitalization and indentation.
5.4.3 Miscellaneous Speech Commands  Miscellaneous TTS Commands.


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5.4.1 Character, Word And Line Echo.

By default, Emacspeak speaks characters as they are typed --this is called character echo; Words are spoken as they are completed --this is called word echo. Emacspeak can also optionally speak each line as it is typed --this is called line echo.

Character, word and line echo can be toggled --either in the current buffer-- or for all buffers (globally). To toggle the specific echo functionality for all buffers, precede the specific command with C-u. Note that in the documentation below, this use of C-u is indicated using the common Emacs terminology of prefix arg or interactive prefix arg.

control e d k
emacspeak-toggle-character-echo Toggle state of Emacspeak character echo. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.

control e d w
emacspeak-toggle-word-echo Toggle state of Emacspeak word echo. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.

control e d l
emacspeak-toggle-line-echo Toggle state of Emacspeak line echo. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.


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5.4.2 Setting Various Characteristics Of Speech Output.

Emacspeak user commands can set different characteristics of the speech output such as speech rate and punctuations mode.

Emacspeak provides a number of settings that affect how attributes of the text such as capitalization are conveyed. These include settings that produce a short tone for each upper case letter, as well as a smart mode for speaking mixed case words which is especially useful when programming. These settings can be made locally in a given buffer or be applied to all buffers by preceding these commands with C-u.

control e d r
dtk-set-rate Set speaking RATE for the tts. Interactive PREFIX arg means set the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.

control e d f
dtk-set-character-scale Set scale FACTOR for speech rate. Speech rate is scaled by this factor when speaking characters. Interactive PREFIX arg means set the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.

control e d 9 control e d 8 control e d 7 control e d 6 control e d 5 control e d 4 control e d 3 control e d 2 control e d 1 control e d 0
dtk-set-predefined-speech-rate Set speech rate to one of nine predefined levels. Interactive PREFIX arg says to set the rate globally.

control e d p
dtk-set-punctuations Set punctuation mode to MODE. Possible values are `some', `all', or `none'. Interactive PREFIX arg means set the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.

control e d m
dtk-set-pronunciation-mode Set pronunciation MODE. This command is valid only for newer Dectalks, e.g. the Dectalk Express. Possible values are `math, name, europe, spell', all of which can be turned on or off. Argument STATE specifies new state.

control e d s
dtk-toggle-split-caps Toggle split caps mode. Split caps mode is useful when reading Hungarian notation in program source code. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.

control e d c
dtk-toggle-capitalization Toggle capitalization. when set, capitalization is indicated by a short beep. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.

control e d cap C
dtk-toggle-allcaps-beep Toggle allcaps-beep. when set, allcaps words are indicated by a short beep. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result. Note that allcaps-beep is a very useful thing when programming. However it is irritating to have it on when reading documents.

In addition, Emacspeak can convey the indentation of lines as they are spoken-- this is relevant when programming and is the default when working with program source.

control e d i
emacspeak-toggle-audio-indentation Toggle state of Emacspeak audio indentation. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result. Specifying the method of indentation as `tones' results in the Dectalk producing a tone whose length is a function of the line's indentation. Specifying `speak' results in the number of initial spaces being spoken.

Indentation feedback style is set by option emacspeak-audio-indentation-method

The default value is "speak"

See variable `emacspeak-audio-indentation-methods' for possible values. Automatically becomes local in any buffer where it is set.


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5.4.3 Miscellaneous Speech Commands

Speech can be stopped using command dtk-stop --though in normal use, the action of moving the cursor will stop ongoing speech. Speech can also be paused and resumed. The speech server can be stopped and restarted for cases where the user wants to switch to a different server --or in the rare case to nuke a runaway speech server.

Control e s
dtk-stop Stop speech now.

control e p
dtk-pause Pause ongoing speech. The speech can be resumed with command `dtk-resume' normally bound to C-e SPC. Pausing speech is useful when one needs to perform a few actions before continuing to read a large document. Emacspeak gives you speech feedback as usual once speech has been paused. `dtk-resume' continues the interrupted speech irrespective of the buffer in which it is executed. Optional PREFIX arg flushes any previously paused speech.

control e SPACE
dtk-resume Resume paused speech. This command resumes speech that has been suspended by executing command `dtk-pause' bound to C-e p. If speech has not been paused, and variable `dtk-resume-should-toggle' is t then this command will pause ongoing speech.

control e d q
dtk-toggle-quiet Toggle state of the speech device between being quiet and talkative. Useful if you want to continue using an Emacs session that has emacspeak loaded but wish to make the speech shut up. Optional argument PREFIX specifies whether speech is turned off in the current buffer or in all buffers.

control e control s
dtk-emergency-restart Use this to nuke the currently running dtk server and restart it. Useful if you want to switch to another synthesizer while emacspeak is running. Also useful for emergency stopping of speech.

Finally, here are the remaining commands available via the TTS related keymap C-e d.

control e d a
dtk-add-cleanup-pattern Add this pattern to the list of repeating patterns that are cleaned up. Optional interactive prefix arg deletes this pattern if previously added. Cleaning up repeated patterns results in emacspeak speaking the pattern followed by a repeat count instead of speaking all the characters making up the pattern. Thus, by adding the repeating pattern `.' (this is already added by default) emacspeak will say "aw fifteen dot" when speaking the string "..............." instead of "period period period period ".

control e d d
dtk-select-server Select a speech server interactively. This will be the server that is used when you next call either M-x dtk-initialize or C-e C-s. Argument PROGRAM specifies the speech server program.

control e d SPACE
dtk-toggle-splitting-on-white-space Toggle splitting of speech on white space. This affects the internal state of emacspeak that decides if we split text purely by clause boundaries, or also include whitespace. By default, emacspeak sends a clause at a time to the speech device. This produces fluent speech for normal use. However in modes such as `shell-mode' and some programming language modes, clause markers appear infrequently, and this can result in large amounts of text being sent to the speech device at once, making the system unresponsive when asked to stop talking. Splitting on white space makes emacspeak's stop command responsive. However, when splitting on white space, the speech sounds choppy since the synthesizer is getting a word at a time.

control e d RETURN
dtk-set-chunk-separator-syntax Interactively set how text is split in chunks. See the Emacs documentation on syntax tables for details on how characters are classified into various syntactic classes. Argument S specifies the syntax class.

control e d t
emacspeak-dial-dtk Prompt for and dial a phone NUMBER with the Dectalk.

control e d cap V
emacspeak-dtk-speak-version Use this to find out which version of the TTS firmware you are running.

control e d z
emacspeak-zap-dtk Send this command to the TTS engine directly.


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5.5 Voice Lock Mode

The status of voice lock mode can be toggled on and off by issuing the command C-e d v (M-x voice-lock-mode). With a prefix arg, this function applies globally; otherwise, it is local to the current buffer. To have voice lock mode activated automatically when Emacspeak starts, include the following code in your `.emacs' file:

 
(add-hook 'emacs-lisp-mode-hook
'turn-on-voice-lock)

Alternatively, Emacspeak can be set to enable voice lock automatically in all of the major modes that support it. To do so, insert the following statement into your Emacs initialization file:

 
(global-voice-lock-mode t)

Note that the list of major modes in which global-voice-lock-mode will provide automatic activation is specified in the variable voice-lock-global-modes.

The characteristics of the different voice personalities deployed by voice lock mode vary according to the capabilities of the speech synthesizer. The definitions applicable to the Dectalk family of synthesizers are contained in `dtk-voices.el', which is supplied as part of the Emacspeak distribution.

Using voice lock mode, Emacspeak also supports many of the aural style properties defined in level 2 of the World Wide Web Consortium's Cascading Style Sheet specification (see http://www.w3.org/TR/REC-CSS2/. Thus, when Emacspeak is running in conjunction with a cooperating user agent, such as William Perry's Emacspeak/W3 web browser, the rendering of HTML documents can be regulated by style sheets. Examples of style rules which employ the CSS audio properties can be found in the default style sheet which is supplied in the Emacs/W3 distribution.


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5.6 Commands For Speaking Status Information.

The following commands provide miscellaneous information.

control e a
emacspeak-speak-message-again Speak the last message from Emacs once again.

control e m
emacspeak-speak-mode-line Speak the mode-line.

control e cap M
emacspeak-speak-minor-mode-line Speak the minor mode-information.

control e control w
emacspeak-speak-window-information Speaks information about current windows.

control e t
emacspeak-speak-time Speak the time.

control e cap V
emacspeak-speak-version Announce version information for running emacspeak.

control e f
emacspeak-speak-buffer-filename Speak name of file being visited in current buffer. Speak default directory if invoked in a dired buffer, or when the buffer is not visiting any file.

control e h
emacspeak-speak-help Speak help buffer if one present. With prefix arg, speaks the rest of the buffer from point. Negative prefix arg speaks from start of buffer to point.

control e k
emacspeak-speak-current-kill Speak the current kill entry. This is the text that will be yanked in by the next C-y. Prefix numeric arg, COUNT, specifies that the text that will be yanked as a result of a C-y followed by count-1 M-y be spoken. The kill number that is spoken says what numeric prefix arg to give to command yank.

control e v
emacspeak-view-register Display the contents of a register, and then speak it.

control e control @
emacspeak-speak-current-mark Speak the line containing the mark. With no argument, speaks the line containing the mark--this is where `exchange-point-and-mark' C-x C-x would jump. Numeric prefix arg 'COUNT' speaks line containing mark 'n' where 'n' is one less than the number of times one has to jump using `set-mark-command' to get to this marked position. The location of the mark is indicated by an aural highlight achieved by a change in voice personality.

control e control l
emacspeak-speak-line-number Speak the line number of the current line.

control e =
emacspeak-speak-current-column Speak the current column.

control e %
emacspeak-speak-current-percentage Announce the percentage into the current buffer.


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6. The Emacspeak Audio Desktop.

This chapter describes the Emacspeak audio desktop and gives tips and tricks for making use of many of Emacs' powerful features.

The desktop is the work area where you organize the tools of your trade and the information objects relevant to your current activities. In the conventional world of visual GUI-based computing, these tools and information objects manifest themselves as a collection of icons organized in a two-dimensional work-area --this organization is designed to place frequently used objects within easy reach.

Notice that organizing one's work area in terms of visual icons arranged in a two-dimensional area where such an organization is optimized for the available "conversational gestures" of pointing and clicking is an artifact of visual interaction.

In the spirit of a truly speech-enabled application, Emacspeak does not simply provide you spoken access to a particular presentation of your work environment that was initially designed with the "sign language" of visual interaction in mind. Instead, Emacspeak enables you to work with documents and other information objects in a manner that is optimized to aural, eyes-free interaction. A necessary consequence of this setup is that users accustomed to the purely visual manifestation of today's electronic desktop do not immediately perceive the Emacspeak environment as an electronic desktop. This section of the manual hopes to introduce you to a work-style that encourages a different perspective on how one interacts with the computer in performing day-to-day computing tasks.

The end result in my case has been a marked increase in personal productivity.

6.1 Objects Making Up The Emacspeak Desktop  Desktop Objects
6.2 An Object-Oriented Desktop  Object Oriented Desktop
6.3 Emacspeak Specializes Aural Interaction  Context-Sensitive Interaction


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6.1 Objects Making Up The Emacspeak Desktop

A "buffer" is the basic building block of the Emacs and hence the Emacspeak desktop. Any information presented by Emacs is placed in a "buffer". For example, when perusing this manual within Emacs, the "file" containing the documentation is presented in a "buffer". All information objects such as WWW pages, email messages, output from user interaction with command-line shells etc., are presented by Emacs in individual "buffers".

Buffers provide a base level of user interaction; Emacs derives its power by allowing applications to specialize buffers to enable specific types of user-interaction that is optimized for a specific class of information.


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6.2 An Object-Oriented Desktop

The basic "buffer object" can be specialized by Emacs applications to provide optimal interaction. This kind of specialization makes the Emacs environment an object-oriented environment; thus, the basic conversational gesture of "move to the next statement" can be assigned behavior that is appropriate to the content that the user is currently navigating. As an example of such specialization, Emacs provides "specialized modes" for working with English text, programming languages, markup source e.g. HTML or LaTeX documents and so on.


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6.3 Emacspeak Specializes Aural Interaction

The content-specific user interaction described above is a very powerful feature of Emacs, and this is where Emacspeak derives its power. Traditionally, the ability to create buffers specialized for working with specific content-types has been used by the Emacs community to develop versatile programming environments, messaging applications such as mail and news readers, and authoring environments. The clean design present in all of these Emacs extensions in terms of separating application functionality from the user-interface, combined with the availability of the entire source code making up these packages under the open-source model has laid the ground-work for developing Emacspeak as a versatile aural counterpart to the product of years of software engineering that has been invested by the Emacs community. In short, Emacspeak would not exist in its present shape or form without this prior effort.


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6.3.1 Audio Formatted Output

Emacspeak takes advantage of the content-specific knowledge available within specialized buffers to produce "audio formatted" output designed to optimize user interaction. A basic consequence of the above is "voice locking" in specialized modes; a more interesting consequence is the implementation of Aural Cascading Style Sheets (ACSS) in conjunction with the Emacs W3 browser.


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6.3.2 Structured Navigation:

Emacspeak also exploits content-specific knowledge to provide structured navigation of different types of electronic content. In many cases, such structured navigation is an extension of what Emacs provides by default; in other cases, Emacspeak implements the necessary extensions to provide the level of structural navigation needed to work efficiently in an eyes-free environment.

Notable among such structured navigation is Emacs' powerful outline feature. Notice for example, that the Emacspeak FAQ (reached via command emacspeak-view-emacspeak-faq bound to C-e F) takes advantage of Emacs' outline mode to allow you to easily move through the various sections. An example of content-sensitive navigation is provided by the imenu package which dynamically creates a "table of contents" based on the content that is being displayed in a given buffer.


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6.3.3 Navigating The Desktop

In addition to navigating individual information objects, the Emacspeak environment provides speech-enabled navigation of the various buffers that are currently open on the Emacspeak desktop via Emacs' built-in list-buffers feature. Emacs' dired --directory editor-- for browsing the file system, along with the new speedbar package that combines features from dired and imenu round off the suite of navigational tools.


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6.3.4 Everything Is Searchable:

Emacs derives one final advantage from using buffers as the basic building block for the entire desktop. Every Emacs buffer is searchable via a uniform and powerful search interface. Emacs' incremental search works efficiently and consistently to enable you locate "objects" of interest either within a given document or to locate a given object from amongst the various objects that are currently open on the Emacspeak desktop. This is very powerful --where a GUI user is typically limited to quickly locating an object from a relatively small collection --the size of the collection being a direct function of available display real-estate-- the Emacspeak user can typically work with a far larger collection of objects. This is well-suited to the eyes-free environment, where display real-estate has no meaning; so bringing up a list of currently open buffers and performing an incremental search to locate a specific buffer is just as efficient independent of whether you have a few dozen or a few hundred buffers open.

To illustrate the above, my typical working Emacs session lasts between two and three weeks-- over that time I typically accumulate several hundred open buffers holding a large variety of content ranging from program source code to email messages and WWW pages.

Ubiquitous search in the eyes-free environment is critical-- as a comparison, when using a conventional, purely visual WWW browser, users have no means of easily "searching" for say the "submit" button on a WWW page. This inability is a minor annoyance in visual interaction, and the typical mouse-enabled user never uses the find dialog to find a submit button-- it is simply more efficient to point at the submit button given the eye's ability to quickly scan the two-dimensional display. This luxury is absent in an eyes-free environment; as a consequence, blind users confronted by the combination of a visual interface and screen-reader are typically limited to either tabbing through all the controls on a WWW page, or using the sub-optimal find dialog.


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7. Using Online Help With Emacspeak.

Emacs provides an extensive online help system for helping you learn about various aspects of using Emacs. Emacspeak provides online help for its various extensions using this same help system. This chapter explains how to use the online help facilities in order to empower you in discovering powerful and versatile working techniques that will make you more and more productive in your day to day computing.

The online help options are accessed via the C-h prefix key, which must be followed by an additional letter or control character to designate the kind of help desired. For example, C-h t help-with-tutorial visits the Emacs tutorial in a new buffer; C-h i info enters the Info documentation system, from which you can read Texinfo manuals that have been installed on your system, including the Emacs and Emacspeak documentation; and C-h k describe-key provides a description of the Emacs function which is bound to the next key that you type. For learning about the various options that are available via the C-h mechanism described above, view the online help for command help-for-help bound to C-h C-h --using what has been described so far, you would achieve this by pressing C-h k followed by C-h C-h.

Emacspeak users should note that online help is typically displayed in a separate Emacs window. Where it makes sense to do so, Emacspeak will automatically speak the displayed help. Once you've asked for help, you can have the displayed documentation as many times as you wish using Emacspeak command emacspeak-speak-help bound to C-e h. If you want to move through the displayed help a line at a time, switch to the buffer where the help is displayed --the buffer is called *Help*.

Often, in adding an auditory interface to an Emacs extension, such as a web browser or mail reader, Emacspeak defines additional commands and key bindings which enhance the functionality of the spoken feedback provided by the application. This manual does not purport to document all such commands. It is important, therefore, when learning to use the various Emacs extensions which comprise the `audio desktop' (see section 6. The Emacspeak Audio Desktop.) that you take advantage of online help to obtain details of any context-specific features provided by Emacspeak. The following two commands are of particular importance in this regard:

The importance of these help functions can be illustrated by the Emacs/W3 web browser. When point is positioned inside a table, certain key bindings are established with which you can access Emacspeak commands that make it possible to read the rows and columns of the table and explore its structure efficiently. To get a description of these key bindings, you can use W3 to visit the sample HTML file supplied as part of the Emacspeak distribution, and, after having moved point onto the first row of the table, issue the command C-h m describe-mode to create a help buffer containing an explanation of the features offered by W3 mode.

Emacspeak supplements the online help facilities available within Emacs by defining several commands of its own, as follows:


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8. Emacs Packages.

Emacs -- The extensible, self-documenting editor, derives its functionality from its powerful extension mechnaism. This extension mechanism is used to implement many user-level applications such as mail readers, WWW browsers, software development environments and so on. This chapter gives directions on how to locate the right Emacs package for addressing specific tasks. The chapter is organized into logical sections that each pertain to a specific class of tasks; in dividual subsections within a section give a brief overview of particular Emacs packages that have been speech-enabled.

8.1 Document Authoring  
8.2 Structured Editing And Templates  Structured Editing
8.3 Browsing Structured Information  Browsing Structure
8.4 Electronic Messaging Applications  Messaging
8.5 Editting Program Source Code  Editting Program Source
8.6 Software Development Environment  Development Environment
8.7 Desktop Management  
8.8 Personal Information Management  
8.9 Desktop Applications  

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8.1 Document Authoring

The Emacspeak environment provides a rich collection of structured document authoring tools. These are well-suited for working in an eyes-free environment --you clearly do not want to use a What You See Is What You Get (WYSIWYG) authoring tool if you cannot see what you're getting. Structure-based authoring tools allow you to focus on the act of content creation, leaving the minutiae of visual layout to the computer.

8.1.1 Creating Well-formatted Documents  Authoring Content.
8.1.2 Searching, Replacing, And Spell Checking  Fixing errors.


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8.1.1 Creating Well-formatted Documents

Before authoring a document, decide its primary audience if the document contains relatively simple content e.g., no mathematical equations etc. and is primarily targetted at the WWW, you are probably better off using HTML. You can create well-structured HTML documents with the help of package html-helper-mode available from ftp://ftp.reed.edu/pub/src/html-helper-mode.tar.gz. Package html-helper-mode is speech-enabled by Emacspeak to provide auditory icons, structured navigation and outlines, as well as voice locking for audio formatted feedback as you work.

If the document being authored is more complex, you are usually better off creating it in LaTeX. Note that LaTeX documents can be converted to HTML either via package tth or package latex2html --both available on the WWW.

The TeX family of typesetting languages is suitable for producing well-formatted documents in an eyes-free environment. Unlike WYSIWYG environments, the author of a TeX or LaTeX document works with the content of the document, leaving it to the formatting system (TeX) to format the document for good visual presentation.

The auctex package is an Emacs extension that facilitates authoring and maintaining structured documents in TeX and LaTeX. Package bibtex facilitates maintainance and use of bibtex bibliography databases. The Texinfo package allows creation of software documentation that is suitable for both printing as well as online viewing as hypertext. Emacspeak speech-enables packages auctex, bibtex and texinfo to provide convenient spoken feedback as you create and compile documents. For details on using these packages, see their accompanying online info documentation.

The most recent version of package auctex is always available by ftp at ftp://ftp.iesd.auc.dk/pub/emacs-lisp/auctex.tar.gz. Packages bibtex and texinfo are part of the standard Emacs distribution.

As the document preparation system of choice, Emacspeak supports a fluent speech-enabled interface to editing and formatting LaTeX documents. This interface is provided by speech-enabling auctex mode.

Mode auctex provides efficient keyboard shortcuts for inserting and maintaining LaTeX markup as a document is being authored. All of these editing commands provide succinct auditory feedback when used with Emacspeak. The syntax coloring provided by this mode is extended to provide voice locking --- consequently, Emacspeak uses different voices to speak the embedded markup to set it apart from the content.

Mode auctex can be used to create empty document templates and to insert document content at the appropriate places in the template. The mode also enables structured navigation of the document as it is being edited. Emacspeak speech-enables these template creation and structured navigation commands to produce auditory icons and succinct spoken feedback. For example, while editing, the user can quickly browse through the sections of the document and have each section title spoken. Document elements such as paragraphs and bulleted lists can be manipulated as logical units. These features are especially relevant in an eyes-free environment where the user needs to select logical parts of the document without having to point at portions of a visual display.

Finally, Emacs supports creating and maintaining SGML and XML documents. Emacs comes with a fairly simple sgml-mode --in addition, package psgml provides sophisticated parsing and validation facilities for working with SGML and XML documents. Package psgml can be downloaded from http://w4.lns.cornell.edu/public/COMP/info/psgml/psgml_toc.html.


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8.1.2 Searching, Replacing, And Spell Checking

Incremental search, a process by which the system prompts the user for a search string and moves the selection to the next available match while allowing the user to add more characters to the search string, is the search technique of choice amongst most Emacs users. As the system successively finds each match and provides the user the option of continuing the search. Incremental search is a more complex instance of traditional search interaction because in addition to either stopping or continuing the search, the user can modify the current search in a number of ways including specifying a longer (or shorter) search string.

All of the user commands available during incremental search are documented in the online Emacs info manual. These are speech-enabled by Emacspeak to provide spoken prompts as the dialogue begins; auditory icons indicate a search hit or search miss as the search progresses. Along with auditory icons search-hit and search-miss the user also hears the current line spoken, and in the case of a search hit, the matching text is aurally highlighted by using the standard audio formatting technique of changing voice characteristic. This feedback proves extremely effective when the search pattern appears several times on a single line; the user is unambiguously cued to the current match.

Search and replace actions are an extension to the basic conversational gestures of a search dialogue. In addition to specifying a search string, the user also specifies a replacement string. On the Emacspeak desktop, this functionality is provided by command query-replace. The speech-enabled version of this interaction prompts the user for the search and replacement texts. The auditory feedback during the interactive search and replacement process parallels that described in the case of incremental search. Audio formatting to indicate the occurrence that is about to be replaced proves an effective means of avoiding erroneous modifications to the text being edited. As an example, consider using command query-replace to locate and replace the second occurrence of foo with bar in the text `Do not change this fool, but change this food.' When the search matches the first occurrence of foo in word fool, the aural highlighting helps the user in answering "no" in response to question "should this occurrence be replaced". In addition to allowing the user to supply a simple "yes or no" answer for each match, command query-replace also allows the user to specify a number of other valid answers as described in the online Emacs documentation.


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Spell Checking

A more complex instance of conversational gesture "search and replace" is exhibited by standard spell checking dialogues. Spell checking differs from the search and replace dialogue described above in that the search and replacement text is guessed by the system based on an available dictionary. Words that are not found in the dictionary are flagged as potential spelling errors, and the system offers an interactive search and replace dialogue for each of these possible errors. During this dialogue, the system successively selects each occurrence of the possibly erroneous word and offers a set of possible replacements. Unlike in the case of simple search and replace, more than one possible replacement string is offered, since a potential spelling error can be corrected by more than one word appearing in the dictionary.

In the visual interface, such spell checking dialogues are realized by displaying the available choices in a pop-up window and allowing the user to pick a correction Once a correction is selected, the user is offered the choice of interactively replacing the erroneous word with the correction.

The spell checking interface on the Emacspeak desktop is speech-enabled to provide fluent auditory feedback. The visual interface parallels that described above and is provided by package ispell which is part of the standard Emacs distribution. Emacspeak provides a spoken prompt that is composed of the line containing the possibly erroneous word (which is aurally highlighted to set it apart from the rest of the text on that line) and the available corrections. Each correction is prefixed with a number that the user can use to select it. Once a correction is selected, the interaction continues with the query and replace interaction described earlier. The speech interface to the spell checker is as fluent as the visual interface. Notice that Emacspeak users do not need to concern themselves with the details of the visual display such as "the corrections are displayed in a window at the top of the screen".

In addition to the standard spell checker described above, newer versions of Emacs include an "on-the-fly" spell checker that flags erroneous words as they are typed. Emacspeak speech-enables package flyspell so that such erroneous words are aurally highlighted.


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8.2 Structured Editing And Templates

Editing documents based on the inherent structure present in the electronic encoding can be very efficient when using spoken interaction. We described mode auctex -- a specialized interface to authoring LaTeX documents as a special instance of such structured editing in see section 8.1 Document Authoring.

The Emacspeak desktop allows the user to efficiently author and maintain an electronic document based either on the structure present in the markup (as in the case of mode auctex) or on special outlining constructs that allow the user to impose a desired logical structure on the document. This section describes the effect of speech-enabling such editing tools and points out the advantages in using these in a speech oriented interface.

Template-based authoring -- a technique that allows the user to create a document by inserting contents into appropriate positions in a predefined template-- goes hand in hand with such structured editing. Finally, structured editing can vastly simplify the creation and maintenance of structured data, for example, the data present in a UNIX password file. Such data files are in fact nothing more than a collection of database records, where each record (or line) consists of a set of fields delimited by a special character. Maintaining such files without exploiting the underlying structure often tends to be error prone. We describe editing modes that can exploit such record structure to provide a fluent editing interface. Finally, we outline a speech-enabled interface to a spreadsheet application as a complex instance of such structured data editing.

8.2.1 Outline Editing  Editing and navigating outlines.
8.2.2 Template-based Authoring  Creating and Filling Templates.
8.2.3 Maintaining Structured Data  Structured Data.


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8.2.1 Outline Editing

All of the various outline editing interfaces on the Emacs desktop allow the user to hide or show the contents at the different levels of a possibly nested tree structure. Components of this tree structure can be manipulated as a unit, e.g., entire subtrees can be deleted or copied. Outline editing thus provides an efficient means of obtaining quick overviews of a document.

The visual interface displays such hidden content as a series of ellipses following the visible outline heading. Emacspeak produces auditory icon ellipses when speaking such outline headings.

The basic outline mode allows the user to specify the syntax and level of outline header lines as a regular expression. This simple technique can be used to advantage in the structured navigation of large electronic texts such as those available on the Internet from online book projects such as project Gutenberg and the Internet Wiretap. For example, when this feature is activated while reading the electronic text of a Shakespearean play, the different acts can be recognized as separate nodes in the logical structure of the document. The user can then hide the document body with a single keystroke, navigate the outline headings to find a particular act, and have that portion rendered either visually or aurally. Hiding an outline level produces auditory icon close-object; exposing a hidden level produces auditory icon open-object. For details on using mode outline, see the relevant section of the online Emacs info manual.

The basic outline facility described above is applicable to all content being edited or browsed on the Emacspeak desktop. In addition, Emacspeak has other specialized outline editing modes such as folding mode that provide extended outlining facilities. In mode folding, the user can create (possibly nested) folds -- logical containers of content that are delimited by a special fold mark. The fold mark is typically a text string that is chosen based on the type of content that is being manipulated. Thus, when folding a C~program source file, fold marks are created from C~comments. The user can open or close any or all folds in a document, and these actions are accompanied by auditory icons open-object and close-object. By entering a fold, all editing actions are restricted to the contents of that fold; this proves a simple yet convenient way of constraining editing actions such as search and replace to specific portions of large documents. Folds can be manipulated as a unit and can be deleted, copied or moved.

Mode folding proves especially effective in maintaining large software modules. The technique can be used to advantage by creating folds for different sections in a module and by further placing each function appearing in a particular % section in a fold of its own. Complex functions can themselves be folded into sections where each section reflects a different stage in the algorithm implemented by that function. Thus, the technique of folding can be used as an effective aid in literate programming. I typically write software modules by first creating an outline structure using folds that reflect the various components of that module. Next, I populate each fold with the function signatures and documentation for the functions in each section. When I am satisfied with the overall architecture of the module, I fill in the function skeletons with actual program code. This technique is used extensively in maintaining the Emacspeak code base.


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8.2.2 Template-based Authoring

Emacspeak supports two powerful template-based authoring subsystems that enable the user to quickly create and fill in templates. Dmacro (short for "dynamic macros") allows the user to define and invoke template-based macros that are specialized for creating different types of content. For example, when programming in C, the user can invoke dynamic macros that insert skeletons of standard C constructs with a few keystrokes. This form of editing has numerous advantages in creating consistently structured code when developing large software modules. Emacspeak speech-enables mode dmacro to provide succinct spoken feedback as templates are created and filled. The user invokes dmacro via command insert dmacro, which is typically bound to a single key. This results in a dialogue where the user is prompted to pick one of the dynamic macros available in the current context. If the users choice can be uniquely completed, that completion is spoken; otherwise, the list of possible completions based on the available partial input is spoken, accompanied by auditory icon help.

An alternative template-editing facility is provided by mode tempo This mode is designed to be used in creating template-based editing tools for specific markup languages; a good example is mode html-helper, a mode for creating and updating HTML documents for publishing on the WWW (see see section 8.1 Document Authoring).


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8.2.3 Maintaining Structured Data

Consider the following entry from file /etc/passwd on my laptop.

`aster:KlZVoUxwQQBT2:501:100:Aster Labrador:/home/aster:/bin/bash'

File /etc/passwd is a simple instance of a text file that stores structured data records as a series of fields delimited by a special character. Each item in the file acquires meaning from the position in which it occurs for example, the fifth field contains the user name, Aster Labrador. More generally, structured data where each field in a record has meaning is found throughout the desktop in applications ranging from entries in a rolodex to rows in a spreadsheet.

Typically, users do not directly edit the stored representation of the data. Instead, application front-ends provide a more human-centric (and hopefully less error prone) user interface for modifying and maintaining the data. Thus, spreadsheet applications present the data as a two dimensional table that is automatically updated to reflect changes in the underlying data. The two dimensional table is perhaps the most commonly found visual front-end to structured data tables with row and column headers prove a succinct way of implicitly displaying the meaning along with the value of the fields making up each data record.


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8.3 Browsing Structured Information

This section describes packages that allow you to browse structured information --these are distinct from the tools described in 8.2 Structured Editing And Templates, in that they are typically used for working with content that is read-only e.g., online documentation.


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8.4 Electronic Messaging Applications

Working with messaging applications involves both authoring and browsing content. Emacspeak provides a rich set of speech-enabled messaging tools. Further, all of the tools described in the previous sections integrate smoothly with the messaging applications described here; this means that you do not need to re-learn a new set of work habits when dealing with content in your messaging application.


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8.5 Editting Program Source Code

Files containing program source code form a very specific class of structured documents. Unlike documents meant for human consumption that are often only loosely structured, program source (as a concession to the computer's intolerance of lack of structure) are per force well-structured and adhere to a fairly stringent syntax.

The Emacs environment provides editting modes that are specific to creating and maintaining software written in most popular programming languages. Many of these editting modes are speech-enabled by Emacspeak. Speech-enabling these modes includes providing a rich set of navigational commands that allow you to move through the source efficiently. In addition, Emacspeak's core voice-lock facilities are used to produce audio formatted output --this helps you spot errors quickly.


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8.6 Software Development Environment

In addition to providing specialized editting modes for creating and maintaining program source, Emacs provides a rich set of software development tools that can be combined to create powerful Integrated Development Environments (IDE). These IDEs are speech-enabled by Emacspeak to provide a versatile and powerful environment for eyes-free software development.


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8.7 Desktop Management

Emacs provides an integrated environment for performing all of ones day-to-day computing tasks ranging from electronic messaging to software development. The environment derives its power from the fact that this integration allows for content to be handled across different tasks in a seamless manner. In order to work effectively with large Emacs sessions with many documents and applications open at the same time, the Emacspeak desktop provides a powerful collection of desktop management tools designed to help the user easily locate objects that pertain to a given task.


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8.8 Personal Information Management

This section describes speech-enabled tools designed to aid in personal information management such as maintaining a daily calendar.


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8.9 Desktop Applications


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8.9.1 Spread Sheets

Spreadsheet applications present a two dimensional view of structured data where the field values are (possibly) mutually dependent. On the Emacspeak desktop, a speech-enabled spreadsheet application can be used to manipulate such data-driven documents% ranging from simple cheque books and expense reports to complex investment portfolios. Where the traditional visual interface to spreadsheets is typically independent of the semantics of the data stored in the spreadsheet, the speech-enabled interface is derived from the meaning of the various fields making up the data. When presenting such information on a visual display, implicit visual layout can be used to cue the user to the meaning of different data fields. On the other hand, in the case of an actively scrolling auditory display, the spoken output needs to explicitly convey both the value and interpretation of the different data items. In addition, the interface needs to enable an active dialogue between user and application where the user is able to query the system about the possible meaning of a particular item of data. Finally, the aural interface needs to enable multiple views of the display. In the visual interface, such multiple views are automatically enabled by the two dimensional layout combined with the eye's ability to move rapidly around the layout structure. Thus, while viewing any particular row of a portfolio, one can immediately see the current total value as well as the net gain or loss. The Emacs spread-sheet package dismal can be retrieved from ftp://cs.nyu.edu/pub/local/fox/dismal.


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8.9.2 Forms Mode

Forms mode an Emacs mode designed to edit structured data records like the line shown from file /etc/passwd presents a user-friendly visual interface that displays the field name along with the field value. The user can edit the field value and save the file, at which point the data is written out using the underlying : delimited representation. Mode forms provides a flexible interface to associating meaning to the fields of such structured data files. For details on it use, see the forms-mode section of the online Emacs info documentation.


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8.9.3 OCR --Reading Print Documents

Module emacspeak-ocr implements an OCR front-end for the Emacspeak desktop.

Page image is acquired using tools from package SANE (Scanner Access Now Easy). The acquired image is run through the OCR engine if one is available, and the results placed in a buffer that is suitable for browsing the results. This buffer is placed in mode emacspeak-ocr-mode a specialized mode for reading and scanning documents.


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8.9.3.1 Emacspeak OCR Mode

Emacspeak OCR mode is a special major mode for document scanning and OCR.

Pre-requisites:

Make sure your scanner back-end works, and that you have the utilities to scan a document and acquire an image as a tiff file. Then set variable emacspeak-ocr-scan-image-program to point at this utility. By default, this is set to `scanimage' which is the image scanning utility provided by SANE.

By default, this front-end attempts to compress the acquired tiff image; make sure you have a utility like tiffcp. Variable emacspeak-ocr-compress-image is set to `tiffcp' by default; if you use something else, you should customize this variable.

Next, make sure you have an OCR engine installed and working. By default this front-end assumes that OCR is available as /usr/bin/ocr.

Once you have ensured that acquiring an image and applying OCR to it work independently of Emacs, you can use this Emacspeak front-end to enable easy OCR access from within Emacspeak.

The Emacspeak OCR front-end is launched by command emacspeak-ocr bound to C-e C-o.

This command switches to a special buffer that has OCR commands bounds to single keystrokes-- see the ke-binding list at the end of this description. Use Emacs online help facility to look up help on these commands.

Mode emacspeak-ocr-mode provides the necessary functionality to scan, OCR, read and save documents. By default, scanned images and the resulting text are saved under directory ~/ocr; see variable emacspeak-ocr-working-directory. Invoking command emacspeak-ocr-open-working-directory bound to d will open this directory.

By default, the document being scanned is named `untitled'. You can name the document by using command emacspeak-ocr-name-document bound to n. The document name is used in constructing the name of the image and text files.

Here is a list of all emacspeak OCR commands along with their key-bindings and a brief description:

digit
emacspeak-ocr-page Jumps to specified page in the OCR output.

c
emacspeak-ocr-set-compress-image-options

Interactively update image compression options. Prompts with current setting in the minibuffer. Setting persists for current Emacs session.

i
emacspeak-ocr-set-scan-image-options Interactively update scan image options. Prompts with current setting in the minibuffer. Setting persists for current Emacs session.

spc
emacspeak-ocr-read-current-page Speaks current page.
s
emacspeak-ocr-save-current-page Saves current page as a text file.

p
emacspeak-ocr-page Prompts for a page number and moves to the specified page.

]
emacspeak-ocr-forward-page Move forward to the next page.

[
emacspeak-ocr-backward-page Move back to the previous page.

d
emacspeak-ocr-open-working-directory Open directory containing the results of OCR.

n
emacspeak-ocr-name-document Name current document.

o
emacspeak-ocr-recognize-image Launch OCR engine on a scanned image.

i
emacspeak-ocr-scan-image Acquire an image using scanimage.

RET
emacspeak-ocr-scan-and-recognize Scan and recognize a page.

w
emacspeak-ocr-write-document Write all pages of current document to a text file.

q
bury-buffer Bury the OCR buffer.
c
emacspeak-ocr-customize Customize Emacspeak OCR settings.

?
describe-mode Describe OCR mode.


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9. Running Terminal Based Applications

You can use the terminal emulator mode to run arbitrary terminal-based programs from within Emacs. You open a terminal emulator buffer using M-x term, with an extra carriage return to accept the default shell (such as bash). (Incidently, don't confuse this command with M-x terminal-emulator, which starts an older terminal emulator mode not supported by Emacspeak.)

Three kinds of commands are used within the terminal emulator. Normal term commands use a prefix of C-c. The emacspeak commands for eterm mode use a prefix of C-t. Anything else is a normal shell command.

There are two sub-modes of term mode: char sub-mode and line sub-mode. In char sub-mode, emacspeak will only speak the final chunk of output --typically the last line displayed. Each character typed (except `term-escape-char`) is sent immediately. Use char sub-mode for screen oriented programs like vi or pine.

In line sub-mode, program output is spoken if user option eterm-autospeak is turned on. When you type a return at the end of the buffer, that line is sent as input, while return not at end copies the rest of the line to the end and sends it. When using terminal line mode with option eterm-autospeak turned on, speech feedback is similar to that obtained in regular shell-mode buffers.

The default is char sub-mode. You can switch to line sub-mode with C-c C-j (recall that control J is a linefeed), and back to char sub-mode with C-c C-k (think of character spelled with a K).

Note: Use char-mode with the terminal emulator for running screen-oriented programs like Lynx or Pine. For regular shell interaction just use M-x shell instead of using the terminal emulator.


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9.1 Char Sub-mode of Term Mode

In char sub-mode of term, each character you type is sent directly to the inferior process without intervention from emacs, except for the escape character (usually C-c).

Here are some of the useful commands for the char sub-mode. Note that the usual commands for killing a buffer or switching buffers do not work in this mode, so new key bindings are supplied. The first five commands are different ways of leaving this mode.

`C-c C-j'
`M-x term-line-mode'
Switch to line sub-mode of term mode.

`C-c o'
`M-x other-window'
Select the next window on this frame. All windows on current frame are arranged in a cyclic order. This command selects the next window in that order. If there are no other windows, this command does nothing.

`C-c C-f'
`M-x find-file'
Switch to a buffer visiting a file, creating one if none already exists.

`C-c 0'
`M-x delete-window'
Remove current window from the display.

`C-c k'
`M-x kill-buffer'
Kill the current buffer.

`C-c C-x C-c'
`M-x save-buffers-kill-emacs'
Offer to save each buffer, then kill this Emacs process.

`C-c C-d'
`M-x list-directory'
Display a list of files in or matching DIRNAME, a la `ls'. DIRNAME is globbed by the shell if necessary. Prefix arg (C-u) means supply -l switch to `ls'. The list appears in a second window.

`C-c 1'
`M-x delete-other-windows'
Delete all other windows in the frame, making the current window fill its frame.

`C-c C-c'
`M-x term-send-raw'
Send the last character typed through the terminal-emulator without any interpretation.

`C-c ('
`M-x start-kbd-macro'
Record subsequent keyboard input, defining a keyboard macro. The commands are recorded even as they are executed. Use C-c ) to finish recording and make the macro available. Use M-x name-last-kbd-macro to give it a permanent name. Prefix arg (C-u) means append to last macro defined; This begins by re-executing that macro as if you had typed it again.

`C-c )'
`M-x end-kbd-macro'
Finish defining a keyboard macro. The definition was started by C-c (. The macro is now available for use via C-c e, or it can be given a name with M-x name-last-kbd-macro and then invoked under that name.

`C-c e'
`M-x call-last-kbd-macro'
Call the last keyboard macro that you defined with C-c (. A prefix argument serves as a repeat count. Zero means repeat until error.

You can get a list of all the key sequences with a C-c prefix by typing C-c C-h while in this sub-mode. Some of those commands are only available in the char sub-mode, while others are generally available.


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9.2 Line Sub-mode of Term Mode

In line sub-mode of term mode, emacs editing commands work normally, until you type RET which sends the current line to the inferior process.

Here are some of the useful commands for the line sub-mode of the term mode. In addition, the usual commands for handling a buffer work in this mode (C-x o to switch windows, C-x k to kill a buffer, C-x f to find a file, and so forth).

`C-c C-k'
`M-x term-char-mode'
Switch to char sub-mode of term mode.

`C-c C-z'
`M-x term-stop-subjob'
Stop the current subjob. Resume the subjob in the foreground with the ordinary command fg, or run it in the background with bg. WARNING: if there is no current subjob, you can end up suspending the top-level process running in the buffer. If you accidentally do this, use M-x term-continue-subjob to resume the process. (This is not a problem with with most shells, including bash, since they ignore this signal.)

`C-c C-\'
`M-x term-quit-subjob'
Send quit signal to the current subjob.

`C-c C-c'
`M-x term-interrupt-subjob'
Interrupt the current subjob.

`C-c C-w'
`M-x backward-kill-word'
Kill characters backward until encountering the end of a word.

`C-c C-u'
`M-x term-kill-input'
Kill all text from last stuff output by interpreter to point.

`C-c C-a'
`M-x term-bol'
Goes to the beginning of line, then skips past the prompt, if any. If a prefix argument is given (C-u), then no prompt skip -- go straight to column 0.

`C-c C-d'
`M-x term-send-eof'
Send an end of file character (EOF) to the current buffer's process.

You can get a list of all the key sequences with a C-c prefix by typing C-c C-h while in this sub-mode. Some of those commands are only available in the line sub-mode, while others are generally available.


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9.3 Eterm Mode Commands

The eterm mode maintains a pointer, which is not necessarily the same as the terminal's cursor. It is intended to be used in eterm's char submode. In char submode, C-t , (that's control-t followed by comma) will tell you where the eterm pointer is. C-t C-i will tell you where the terminal's cursor is. The top left corner of the window is "row 0 column 0".

The eterm pointer can be moved with C-t < (to the top of the screen), C-t > (to the bottom of the screen), C-t n (to the next line), C-t p (to the previous line), and C-t . (to the cursor). Each of these also speaks the line the pointer moves to. You can also search forward with C-t s.

These commands speak without moving the pointer: C-t l (current line), C-t w (current word), C-t c (current character), and C-t [space] (from eterm pointer to cursor).

You may enter review mode with C-t q. In review mode, you can search the buffer and speak its contents, without disturbing the terminal. Commands for moving the pointer are similar to normal editing commands, but without a control key: n and p for next and previous line, f and b for forward and back by characters, < and > for the beginning or end of the buffer. c, w, and l speak the current character, word, and line. s searches forward (not incrementally). A comma speaks the pointer location. A period moves the pointer to the terminal cursor. Return to normal term mode by typing q.


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10. Emacspeak Commands

This chapter is generated automatically from the source-level documentation. Any errors or corrections should be made to the source-level documentation.

10.1 dtk-speak  
10.2 dtk-tcl  
10.3 emacspeak  
10.4 emacspeak-arc  
10.5 emacspeak-aumix  
10.6 emacspeak-bs  
10.7 emacspeak-buff-menu  
10.8 emacspeak-c  
10.9 emacspeak-calendar  
10.10 emacspeak-compile  
10.11 emacspeak-custom  
10.12 emacspeak-daisy  
10.13 emacspeak-dired  
10.14 emacspeak-dismal  
10.15 emacspeak-ecb  
10.16 emacspeak-ediff  
10.17 emacspeak-enriched  
10.18 emacspeak-entertain  
10.19 emacspeak-erc  
10.20 emacspeak-eterm  
10.21 emacspeak-eudc  
10.22 emacspeak-filtertext  
10.23 emacspeak-fix-interactive  
10.24 emacspeak-forms  
10.25 emacspeak-freeamp  
10.26 emacspeak-gnus  
10.27 emacspeak-gomoku  
10.28 emacspeak-gridtext  
10.29 emacspeak-hide  
10.30 emacspeak-ibuffer  
10.31 emacspeak-imcom  
10.32 emacspeak-imenu  
10.33 emacspeak-info  
10.34 emacspeak-keymap  
10.35 emacspeak-kotl  
10.36 emacspeak-man  
10.37 emacspeak-mpg123  
10.38 emacspeak-ocr  
10.39 emacspeak-outline  
10.40 emacspeak-pronounce  
10.41 emacspeak-psgml  
10.42 emacspeak-python  
10.43 emacspeak-realaudio  
10.44 emacspeak-redefine  
10.45 emacspeak-remote  
10.46 emacspeak-rmail  
10.47 emacspeak-solitaire  
10.48 emacspeak-sounds  
10.49 emacspeak-speak  
10.50 emacspeak-speedbar  
10.51 emacspeak-table-ui  
10.52 emacspeak-tabulate  
10.53 emacspeak-tapestry  
10.54 emacspeak-tar  
10.55 emacspeak-tetris  
10.56 emacspeak-tnt  
10.57 emacspeak-url-template  
10.58 emacspeak-view  
10.59 emacspeak-view-process  
10.60 emacspeak-vm  
10.61 emacspeak-w3  
10.62 emacspeak-w3search  
10.63 emacspeak-websearch  
10.64 emacspeak-widget  
10.65 emacspeak-wizards  
10.66 emacspeak-xml-shell  


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10.1 dtk-speak

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module dtk-speak.

dtk-select-server: (PROGRAM)
control e d d

Select a speech server interactively. Argument PROGRAM specifies the speech server program. When called interactively, The selected server is started immediately.

dtk-set-chunk-separator-syntax: (S)
control e d RETURN

Interactively set how text is split in chunks. See the Emacs documentation on syntax tables for details on how characters are classified into various syntactic classes. Argument S specifies the syntax class.

dtk-toggle-debug: (&optional FLAG)
control e d b

Toggle state of the debug FLAG. When debugging is on, you can switch to the buffer *speaker* to examine the output from the process that talks to the speech device by using command C-e d C-M-b. Note: *speaker* is a hidden buffer, ie it has a leading space in its name.

dtk-toggle-splitting-on-white-space: ()
control e d SPACE

Toggle splitting of speech on white space. This affects the internal state of emacspeak that decides if we split text purely by clause boundaries, or also include whitespace. By default, emacspeak sends a clause at a time to the speech device. This produces fluent speech for normal use. However in modes such as `shell-mode' and some programming language modes, clause markers appear infrequently, and this can result in large amounts of text being sent to the speech device at once, making the system unresponsive when asked to stop talking. Splitting on white space makes emacspeak's stop command responsive. However, when splitting on white space, the speech sounds choppy since the synthesizer is getting a word at a time.

tts-restart: ()
control e control s

Use this to nuke the currently running TTS server and restart it.

tts-show-debug-buffer: ()
control e d CONTROL meta b

Select TTS debugging buffer.


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10.2 dtk-tcl

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module dtk-tcl.

dtk-add-cleanup-pattern: (&optional DELETE)
control e d a

Add this pattern to the list of repeating patterns that are cleaned up. Optional interactive prefix arg deletes this pattern if previously added. Cleaning up repeated patterns results in emacspeak speaking the pattern followed by a repeat count instead of speaking all the characters making up the pattern. Thus, by adding the repeating pattern `.' (this is already added by default) emacspeak will say "aw fifteen dot" when speaking the string "..............." instead of "period period period period "

dtk-notes-shutdown: ()
Shutdown midi system.

dtk-pause: (&optional PREFIX)
control e p

Pause ongoing speech. The speech can be resumed with command `dtk-resume' normally bound to C-e SPC. Pausing speech is useful when one needs to perform a few actions before continuing to read a large document. Emacspeak gives you speech feedback as usual once speech has been paused. `dtk-resume' continues the interrupted speech irrespective of the buffer in which it is executed. Optional PREFIX arg flushes any previously paused speech.

dtk-reset-state: ()
control e d cap R

Restore sanity to the Dectalk. Typically used after the Dectalk has been power cycled.

dtk-resume: ()
control e SPACE

Resume paused speech. This command resumes speech that has been suspended by executing command `dtk-pause' bound to C-e p. If speech has not been paused, and variable `dtk-resume-should-toggle' is t then this command will pause ongoing speech.

dtk-set-character-scale: (FACTOR &optional PREFIX)
control e d f

Set scale FACTOR for speech rate. Speech rate is scaled by this factor when speaking characters. Interactive PREFIX arg means set the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.

dtk-set-predefined-speech-rate: (&optional PREFIX)
control e d 9 control e d 8 control e d 7 control e d 6 control e d 5 control e d 4 control e d 3 control e d 2 control e d 1 control e d 0

Set speech rate to one of nine predefined levels. Interactive PREFIX arg says to set the rate globally. Formula used is: rate = dtk-speech-rate-base + dtk-speech-rate-step * level.

dtk-set-pronunciation-mode: (MODE STATE)
control e d m

Set pronunciation MODE. This command is valid only for newer Dectalks, e.g. the Dectalk Express. Possible values are `math, name, europe, spell', all of which can be turned on or off. Argument STATE specifies new state.

dtk-set-punctuations: (MODE &optional PREFIX)
control e d p

Set punctuation mode to MODE. Possible values are `some', `all', or `none'. Interactive PREFIX arg means set the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.

dtk-set-punctuations-to-all: (&optional PREFIX)
Set punctuation mode to all. Interactive PREFIX arg sets punctuation mode globally.

dtk-set-punctuations-to-some: (&optional PREFIX)
Set punctuation mode to some. Interactive PREFIX arg sets punctuation mode globally.

dtk-set-rate: (RATE &optional PREFIX)
control e d r

Set speaking RATE for the tts. Interactive PREFIX arg means set the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.

dtk-stop: ()
<pause> control e s

Stop speech now.

dtk-toggle-allcaps-beep: (&optional PREFIX)
control e d cap C

Toggle allcaps-beep. when set, allcaps words are indicated by a short beep. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result. Note that allcaps-beep is a very useful thing when programming. However it is irritating to have it on when reading documents.

dtk-toggle-capitalization: (&optional PREFIX)
control e d c

Toggle capitalization. when set, capitalization is indicated by a short beep. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.

dtk-toggle-punctuation-mode: (&optional PREFIX)
Toggle punctuation mode between "some" and "all". Interactive PREFIX arg makes the new setting global.

dtk-toggle-quiet: (&optional PREFIX)
control e d q

Toggle state of the speech device between being quiet and talkative. Useful if you want to continue using an Emacs session that has emacspeak loaded but wish to make the speech shut up. Optional argument PREFIX specifies whether speech is turned off in the current buffer o rin all buffers.

dtk-toggle-speak-nonprinting-chars: (&optional PREFIX)
control e d n

Toggle speak-nonprinting-chars. Switches behavior of how characters with the high bit set are handled. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.

dtk-toggle-split-caps: (&optional PREFIX)
control e d s

Toggle split caps mode. Split caps mode is useful when reading Hungarian notation in program source code. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.

dtk-toggle-stop-immediately-while-typing: (&optional PREFIX)
control e d cap I

Toggle state of variable `dtk-stop-immediately-while-typing'. As the name implies, if T then speech flushes immediately as you type. Optional argument PREFIX specifies if the setting applies to all buffers.


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10.3 emacspeak

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak.

emacspeak-describe-emacspeak: ()
control h control e

Give a brief overview of emacspeak.

emacspeak-submit-bug: ()
control e CONTROL meta b

Function to submit a bug to the programs maintainer.


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10.4 emacspeak-arc

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-arc.

emacspeak-arc-speak-file-modification-time: ()
Speak modification time of the file on current line

emacspeak-arc-speak-file-name: ()
Speak the name of the file on current line

emacspeak-arc-speak-file-permissions: ()
Speak permissions of file current entry

emacspeak-arc-speak-file-size: ()
Speak the size of the file on current line


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10.5 emacspeak-aumix

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-aumix.

emacspeak-aumix: ()
control e (

Setup output parameters of the auditory display. Luanch this tool while you have auditory output on multiple channels playing so you can adjust the settings to your preference. Hit q to quit when you are done.

emacspeak-aumix-edit: ()
Edit aumix settings interactively. Run command M-x emacspeak-aumix-reset after saving the settings to have them take effect.

emacspeak-aumix-reset: ()
Reset to default audio settings.

emacspeak-aumix-volume-decrease: (&optional GAIN)
Decrease overall volume.

emacspeak-aumix-volume-increase: (&optional GAIN)
Increase overall volume.

emacspeak-aumix-wave-decrease: (&optional GAIN)
control e control f <left>

Decrease volume of wave output.

emacspeak-aumix-wave-increase: (&optional GAIN)
control e control f <right>

Increase volume of wave output.


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10.6 emacspeak-bs

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-bs.

emacspeak-bs-speak-buffer-line: ()
Speak information about this buffer


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10.7 emacspeak-buff-menu

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-buff-menu.

emacspeak-list-buffers-next-line: (COUNT)
Speech enabled buffer menu navigation

emacspeak-list-buffers-previous-line: (COUNT)
Speech enabled buffer menu navigation

emacspeak-list-buffers-speak-buffer-line: ()
Speak information about this buffer

emacspeak-list-buffers-speak-buffer-name: ()
Speak the name of the buffer on this line


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10.8 emacspeak-c

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-c.

emacspeak-c-speak-semantics: ()
Speak the C semantics of this line.


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10.9 emacspeak-calendar

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-calendar.

emacspeak-appt-repeat-announcement: ()
control e cap A

Speaks the most recently displayed appointment message if any.

emacspeak-speak-calendar-date: ()
Speak the date under point when called in Calendar Mode.


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10.10 emacspeak-compile

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-compile.

emacspeak-compilation-speak-error: ()
Speech feedback about the compilation error.


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10.11 emacspeak-custom

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-custom.

emacspeak-custom-goto-group: ()
Jump to custom group when in a customization buffer.

emacspeak-custom-goto-toolbar: ()
Jump to custom toolbar when in a customization buffer.


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10.12 emacspeak-daisy

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-daisy.

emacspeak-daisy-mode: ()
A DAISY front-end for the Emacspeak desktop.

Pre-requisites:

0) mpg123 for playing mp3 files 1) libxml and libxslt packages 2) xml-parse.el for parsing XML in Emacs Lisp.

The Emacspeak DAISY front-end is launched by command emacspeak-daisy bound to M-x emacspeak-daisy.

This command switches to a special buffer that has DAISY commands bounds to single keystrokes-- see the ke-binding list at the end of this description. Use Emacs online help facility to look up help on these commands.

emacspeak-daisy-mode provides the necessary functionality to navigate and listen to Daisy talking books.

Here is a list of all emacspeak DAISY commands along with their key-bindings:

key binding --- -------

p previous-line n next-line RET emacspeak-daisy-play-content-under-point SPC emacspeak-daisy-play-audio-under-point q bury-buffer s emacspeak-daisy-stop-audio ? describe-mode

In addition to any hooks its parent mode `text-mode' might have run, this mode runs the hook `emacspeak-daisy-mode-hook', as the final step during initialization.

emacspeak-daisy-open-book: (FILENAME)
control e control b

Open Digital Talking Book specified by navigation file filename.

emacspeak-daisy-play-audio-under-point: ()
Play audio clip under point.

emacspeak-daisy-play-content-under-point: ()
Play SMIL content under point.

emacspeak-daisy-stop-audio: ()
Stop audio.


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10.13 emacspeak-dired

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-dired.

emacspeak-dired-label-fields: ()
Labels the fields of the listing in the dired buffer. Currently is a no-op unless unless `dired-listing-switches' contains -al

emacspeak-dired-show-file-type: ()
Print the type of FILE, according to the `file' command. If FILE is a symbolic link and the optional argument DEREF-SYMLINKS is true then the type of the file linked to by FILE is printed instead.

emacspeak-dired-speak-file-access-time: ()
Speak access time of the current file.

emacspeak-dired-speak-file-modification-time: ()
Speak modification time of the current file.

emacspeak-dired-speak-file-permissions: ()
Speak the permissions of the current file.

emacspeak-dired-speak-file-size: ()
Speak the size of the current file. On a directory line, run du -s on the directory to speak its size.

emacspeak-dired-speak-header-line: ()
Speak the header line of the dired buffer.

emacspeak-dired-speak-symlink-target: ()
Speaks the target of the symlink on the current line.


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10.14 emacspeak-dismal

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-dismal.

emacspeak-dismal-backward-col-and-summarize: (COLS)
Move backward by arg columns (the previous column by default)and summarize it.

emacspeak-dismal-backward-row-and-summarize: (ROWS)
Move backward by arg rows (the previous row by default)and summarize it.

emacspeak-dismal-col-summarize: ()
Summarizes a col using the specification in list emacspeak-dismal-col-summarizer-list

emacspeak-dismal-display-cell-expression: ()
Display the expression in the message area

emacspeak-dismal-display-cell-value: ()
Display the cell value in the message area

emacspeak-dismal-display-cell-with-col-header: ()
Display current cell along with its column header. The `column header' is the entry in row 0.

emacspeak-dismal-display-cell-with-row-header: ()
Displays current cell along with its row header. The `row header' is the entry in column 0.

emacspeak-dismal-forward-col-and-summarize: (COLS)
Move forward by arg columns (the next column by default)and summarize it.

emacspeak-dismal-forward-row-and-summarize: (ROWS)
Move forward by arg rows (the next row by default)and summarize it.

emacspeak-dismal-row-summarize: ()
Summarizes a row using the specification in list emacspeak-dismal-row-summarizer-list

emacspeak-dismal-set-col-summarizer-list: ()
Specify or reset col summarizer list.

emacspeak-dismal-set-row-summarizer-list: ()
Specify or reset row summarizer list.

emacspeak-dismal-set-sheet-summarizer-list: ()
Specify or reset sheet summarizer list.

emacspeak-dismal-sheet-summarize: ()
Summarizes a sheet using the specification in list emacspeak-dismal-sheet-summarizer-list


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10.15 emacspeak-ecb

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-ecb.

emacspeak-ecb-speak-window-directories: ()
Speak contents of directories window.

emacspeak-ecb-speak-window-history: ()
Speak contents of history window.

emacspeak-ecb-speak-window-methods: ()
Speak contents of methods window.

emacspeak-ecb-speak-window-sources: ()
Speak contents of sources window.

emacspeak-ecb-tree-shift-return: ()
Do shift return in ECB tree browser.


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10.16 emacspeak-ediff

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-ediff.

emacspeak-ediff-speak-current-difference: ()
Speak the current difference


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10.17 emacspeak-enriched

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-enriched.

emacspeak-enriched-voiceify-faces: (START END)
Map base fonts to voices. Useful in voicifying rich text.


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10.18 emacspeak-entertain

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-entertain.

emacspeak-hangman-speak-guess: ()
Speak current guessed string.

emacspeak-hangman-speak-statistics: ()
Speak statistics.


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10.19 emacspeak-erc

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-erc.

emacspeak-erc-add-name-to-monitor: (NAME)
Add people to monitor in this room.

emacspeak-erc-delete-name-from-monitor: (NAME)
Remove name to monitor in this room.

emacspeak-erc-toggle-my-monitor: (&optional PREFIX)
Toggle state of ERC monitor of my messages. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.

emacspeak-erc-toggle-room-monitor: (&optional PREFIX)
Toggle state of ERC room monitor. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.


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10.20 emacspeak-eterm

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-eterm.

emacspeak-eterm-copy-region-to-register: (REGISTER)
Copy text from terminal to an Emacs REGISTER. This copies region delimited by the emacspeak eterm marker set by command M-x emacspeak-eterm-set-marker and the emacspeak eterm pointer to a register.

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.

emacspeak-eterm-define-window: (ID)
Prompt for a window ID. The window is then define to be the rectangle delimited by point and eterm mark. This is to be used when emacspeak is set to review mode inside an eterm.

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.

emacspeak-eterm-describe-window: (ID)
Describe an eterm window. Description indicates eterm window coordinates and whether it is stretchable

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.

emacspeak-eterm-goto-line: (LINE)
Move emacspeak eterm pointer to a specified LINE.

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.

emacspeak-eterm-kill-ring-save-region: ()
Copy text from terminal to kill ring. This copies region delimited by the emacspeak eterm marker set by command M-x emacspeak-eterm-set-marker and the emacspeak eterm pointer.

emacspeak-eterm-maybe-send-raw: ()
Send a raw character through if in the terminal buffer. Execute end of line if in a non eterm buffer if executed via C-e C-e

emacspeak-eterm-paste-register: (REGISTER)
Paste contents of REGISTER at current location. If the specified register contains text, then that text is sent to the terminal as if it were typed by the user.

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.

emacspeak-eterm-pointer-backward-word: (COUNT)
Move the pointer backward by words. Interactive numeric prefix arg specifies number of words to move. Argument COUNT specifies number of words by which to move.

emacspeak-eterm-pointer-down: (COUNT)
Move the pointer down a line. Argument COUNT specifies number of lines by which to move.

emacspeak-eterm-pointer-forward-word: (COUNT)
Move the pointer forward by words. Interactive numeric prefix arg specifies number of words to move. Argument COUNT specifies number of words by which to move.

emacspeak-eterm-pointer-left: (COUNT)
Move the pointer left. Argument COUNT specifies number of columns by which to move.

emacspeak-eterm-pointer-right: (COUNT)
Move the pointer right. Argument COUNT specifies number of columns by which to move.

emacspeak-eterm-pointer-to-bottom: ()
Move the pointer to the bottom of the screen.

emacspeak-eterm-pointer-to-cursor: ()
Move the pointer to the cursor.

emacspeak-eterm-pointer-to-left-edge: ()
Move the pointer to the right edge.

emacspeak-eterm-pointer-to-next-color-change: (&optional COUNT)
Move the eterm pointer to the next color change. This allows you to move between highlighted regions of the screen. Optional argument COUNT specifies how many changes to skip.

emacspeak-eterm-pointer-to-previous-color-change: (&optional COUNT)
Move the eterm pointer to the next color change. This allows you to move between highlighted regions of the screen. Optional argument COUNT specifies how many changes to skip.

emacspeak-eterm-pointer-to-right-edge: ()
Move the pointer to the right edge.

emacspeak-eterm-pointer-to-top: ()
Move the pointer to the top of the screen.

emacspeak-eterm-pointer-up: (COUNT)
Move the pointer up a line. Argument COUNT .specifies number of lines by which to move.

emacspeak-eterm-remote-term: (HOST)
control e CONTROL meta r

Start a terminal-emulator in a new buffer.

emacspeak-eterm-search-backward: ()
Search backward on the terminal.

emacspeak-eterm-search-forward: ()
Search forward on the terminal.

emacspeak-eterm-set-focus-window: (FLAG)
Prompt for the id of a predefined window, and set the `focus' window to it. Non-nil interactive prefix arg `unsets' the focus window; this is equivalent to having the entire terminal as the focus window (this is what eterm starts up with). Setting the focus window results in emacspeak monitoring screen and speaking that window upon seeing screen activity.

emacspeak-eterm-set-marker: ()
Set Emacspeak eterm marker. This sets the emacspeak eterm marker to the position pointed to by the emacspeak eterm pointer.

emacspeak-eterm-speak-cursor: ()
Speak cursor position.

emacspeak-eterm-speak-pointer: ()
Speak current pointer position.

emacspeak-eterm-speak-pointer-char: (&optional PREFIX)
Speak char under eterm pointer. Pronounces character phonetically unless called with a PREFIX arg.

emacspeak-eterm-speak-pointer-line: ()
Speak the line the pointer is on.

emacspeak-eterm-speak-pointer-word: ()
Speak the word the pointer is on.

emacspeak-eterm-speak-predefined-window: ()
Speak a predefined eterm window between 1 and 10.

emacspeak-eterm-speak-screen: (&optional FLAG)
Speak the screen. Default is to speak from the emacspeak pointer to point. Optional prefix arg FLAG causes region above the Emacspeak pointer to be spoken.

emacspeak-eterm-speak-window: (ID)
Speak an eterm window. Argument ID specifies the window.

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.

emacspeak-eterm-toggle-focus-window: ()
Toggle active state of focus window.

emacspeak-eterm-toggle-pointer-mode: (FLAG)
Toggle emacspeak eterm pointer mode. With optional interactive prefix arg, turn it on. When emacspeak eterm is in pointer mode, the eterm read pointer stays where it is rather than automatically moving to the terminal cursor when there is terminal activity.

emacspeak-eterm-toggle-review: ()
Toggle state of eterm review. In review mode, you can move around the terminal and listen to the contnets without sending input to the terminal itself.

emacspeak-eterm-yank-window: (ID)
Yank contents of an eterm window at point.

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.

emacspeak-toggle-eterm-autospeak: (&optional PREFIX)
Toggle state of eterm autospeak. When eterm autospeak is turned on and the terminal is in line mode, all output to the terminal is automatically spoken. Interactive prefix arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.


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10.21 emacspeak-eudc

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-eudc.

emacspeak-eudc-send-mail: ()
Send email to the address given by the current record.


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10.22 emacspeak-filtertext

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-filtertext.

emacspeak-filtertext: (START END)
control e ^

Copy over text in region to special filtertext buffer in preparation for interactively filtering text.

emacspeak-filtertext-mode: ()
Major mode for FilterText interaction.

key binding --- -------

r emacspeak-filtertext-revert ^ flush-lines = keep-lines

In addition to any hooks its parent mode `text-mode' might have run, this mode runs the hook `emacspeak-filtertext-mode-hook', as the final step during initialization.

emacspeak-filtertext-revert: ()
Revert to original text.


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10.23 emacspeak-fix-interactive

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-fix-interactive.

emacspeak-fix-all-recent-commands: ()
Fix recently loaded interactive commands. This command looks through `load-history' and fixes commands if necessary. Memoizes call in emacspeak-load-history-pointer to memoize this call.

emacspeak-fix-commands-loaded-from: (MODULE)
Fix all commands loaded from a specified module.


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10.24 emacspeak-forms

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-forms.

emacspeak-forms-find-file: (FILENAME)
Visit a forms file

emacspeak-forms-flush-unwanted-records: ()
Prompt for pattern and flush matching lines

emacspeak-forms-rerun-filter: ()
Rerun filter --allows us to nuke more matching records

emacspeak-forms-speak-field: ()
Speak current form field name and value. Assumes that point is at the front of a field value.

emacspeak-forms-summarize-current-position: ()
Summarize current position in list of records

emacspeak-forms-summarize-current-record: ()
Summarize current record


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10.25 emacspeak-freeamp

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-freeamp.

emacspeak-freeamp: (RESOURCE)
control e control f o

Play specified resource using freeamp. Resource is an MP3 file or m3u playlist. The player is placed in a buffer in emacspeak-freeamp-mode.

emacspeak-freeamp-freeamp-call-command: ()
control e control f q control e control f = control e control f s control e control f b control e control f f control e control f - control e control f + control e control f p

Call appropriate freeamp command.

emacspeak-freeamp-freeamp-command: (CHAR)
Execute FreeAmp command.

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.

emacspeak-freeamp-mode: ()
Major mode for freeamp interaction.

key binding --- -------

<right> emacspeak-aumix-wave-increase <left> emacspeak-aumix-wave-decrease q emacspeak-freeamp-freeamp-call-command = emacspeak-freeamp-freeamp-call-command s emacspeak-freeamp-freeamp-call-command b emacspeak-freeamp-freeamp-call-command f emacspeak-freeamp-freeamp-call-command - emacspeak-freeamp-freeamp-call-command + emacspeak-freeamp-freeamp-call-command p emacspeak-freeamp-freeamp-call-command o emacspeak-freeamp

This mode runs the hook `emacspeak-freeamp-mode-hook', as the final step during initialization.


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10.26 emacspeak-gnus

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-gnus.

emacspeak-gnus-summary-catchup-quietly-and-exit: ()
Catch up on all articles in current group.


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10.27 emacspeak-gomoku

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-gomoku.

emacspeak-gomoku-display-statistics: ()
Display statistics from previous games

emacspeak-gomoku-goto-x-y: (X Y)
Prompt for and go to that square.

emacspeak-gomoku-show-current-column: ()
Aurally display current column

emacspeak-gomoku-show-current-negative-diagonal: ()
Aurally display current negative sloped diagonal

emacspeak-gomoku-show-current-positive-diagonal: ()
Aurally display current positively sloped diagonal

emacspeak-gomoku-show-current-row: ()
Aurally display current row

emacspeak-gomoku-speak-emacs-previous-move: ()
Speak emacs' previous move

emacspeak-gomoku-speak-humans-previous-move: ()
Speak human' previous move

emacspeak-gomoku-speak-number-of-moves: ()
Speak number of moves so far

emacspeak-gomoku-speak-square: ()
Speak coordinates and state of square at point


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10.28 emacspeak-gridtext

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-gridtext.

emacspeak-gridtext-apply: (START END GRID)
control e # a

Apply grid to region.

emacspeak-gridtext-load: (FILE)
control e # l

Load saved grid settings.

emacspeak-gridtext-save: (FILE)
control e # s

Save out grid settings.


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10.29 emacspeak-hide

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-hide.

emacspeak-hide-or-expose-all-blocks: ()
Hide or expose all blocks in buffer.

emacspeak-hide-or-expose-block: (&optional PREFIX)
control e j

Hide or expose a block of text. This command either hides or exposes a block of text starting on the current line. A block of text is defined as a portion of the buffer in which all lines start with a common PREFIX. Optional interactive prefix arg causes all blocks in current buffer to be hidden or exposed.

emacspeak-hide-speak-block-sans-prefix: ()
control e control j

Speaks current block after stripping its prefix. If the current block is not hidden, it first hides it. This is useful because as you locate blocks, you can invoke this command to listen to the block, and when you have heard enough navigate easily to move past the block.


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10.30 emacspeak-ibuffer

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-ibuffer.

emacspeak-ibuffer-speak-buffer-line: ()
Speak information about this buffer


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10.31 emacspeak-imcom

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-imcom.

emacspeak-imcom: ()
Start IMCom.

emacspeak-imcom-mode: ()
Major mode for Jabber interaction using IMCom.

key binding --- -------

C-c Prefix Command

C-c v emacspeak-imcom-view-chat-session

In addition to any hooks its parent mode `comint-mode' might have run, this mode runs the hook `emacspeak-imcom-mode-hook', as the final step during initialization.

emacspeak-imcom-view-chat-session: (SESSION)
Display specified chat session.


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10.32 emacspeak-imenu

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-imenu.

emacspeak-imenu-goto-next-index-position: ()
Goto the next index position in current buffer

emacspeak-imenu-goto-previous-index-position: ()
Goto the previous index position in current buffer

emacspeak-imenu-speak-this-section: ()
Speak upto start of next index entry


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10.33 emacspeak-info

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-info.

emacspeak-info-speak-header: ()
Speak info header line.


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10.34 emacspeak-keymap

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-keymap.

emacspeak-keymap-choose-new-emacspeak-prefix: (PREFIX-KEY)
Interactively select a new prefix key to use for all emacspeak commands. The default is to use `C-e' This command lets you switch the prefix to something else. This is a useful thing to do if you run emacspeak on a remote machine from inside a terminal that is running inside a local emacspeak session. You can have the remote emacspeak use a different control key to give your fingers some relief.

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.


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10.35 emacspeak-kotl

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-kotl.

emacspeak-kotl-setup-keys: ()
Setup additional keybindings

emacspeak-kotl-speak-cell: (ARG)
Speak cell contents from point to end of cell. With prefix arg, speaks entire cell contents


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10.36 emacspeak-man

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-man.

emacspeak-man-browse-man-page: ()
Browse the man page --read it a paragraph at a time

emacspeak-man-speak-this-section: ()
Speak current section


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10.37 emacspeak-mpg123

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-mpg123.

emacspeak-mp3-playlist-play: (PLAYLIST &optional DONT-SHUFFLE)
Play a playlist. Optional interactive prefix arg says not to shuffle the list. Use command M-x emacspeak-mp3-playlist-skip to skip to the next track.

emacspeak-mp3-playlist-skip: ()
Skip currently playing track.

emacspeak-mp3-playlist-stop: ()
Kill currently playing playlist.

emacspeak-mpg123-backward-minute: (ARG)
Move back by specified number of minutes.

emacspeak-mpg123-forward-minute: (ARG)
Forw by ARG minutes.

emacspeak-mpg123-speak-current-time: ()
Speak time in current track.

emacspeak-mpg123-speak-filename: ()
Speak filename of the current song.

emacspeak-mpg123-speak-length: ()
Speak duration of the current song.

emacspeak-mpg123-speak-title: ()
Speak title of the current song.


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10.38 emacspeak-ocr

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-ocr.

emacspeak-ocr: ()
control e control o

An OCR front-end for the Emacspeak desktop.

Page image is acquired using tools from the SANE package. The acquired image is run through the OCR engine if one is available, and the results placed in a buffer that is suitable for browsing the results.

For detailed help, invoke command emacspeak-ocr bound to C-e C-o to launch emacspeak-ocr-mode, and press `?' to display mode-specific help for emacspeak-ocr-mode.

emacspeak-ocr-backward-page: (&optional COUNT-IGNORED)
Like backward page, but tracks page number of current document.

emacspeak-ocr-customize: ()
Customize OCR settings.

emacspeak-ocr-forward-page: (&optional COUNT-IGNORED)
Like forward page, but tracks page number of current document.

emacspeak-ocr-mode: ()
An OCR front-end for the Emacspeak desktop.

Pre-requisites:

1) A working scanner back-end like SANE on Linux.

2) An OCR engine.

1: Make sure your scanner back-end works, and that you have the utilities to scan a document and acquire an image as a tiff file. Then set variable emacspeak-ocr-scan-image-program to point at this utility. By default, this is set to `scanimage' which is the image scanning utility provided by SANE.

By default, this front-end attempts to compress the acquired tiff image; make sure you have a utility like tiffcp. Variable emacspeak-ocr-compress-image is set to `tiffcp' by default; if you use something else, you should customize this variable.

2: Next, make sure you have an OCR engine installed and working. By default this front-end assumes that OCR is available as /usr/bin/ocr.

Once you have ensured that acquiring an image and applying OCR to it work independently of Emacs, you can use this Emacspeak front-end to enable easy OCR access from within Emacspeak.

The Emacspeak OCR front-end is launched by command emacspeak-ocr bound to C-e C-o.

This command switches to a special buffer that has OCR commands bounds to single keystrokes-- see the ke-binding list at the end of this description. Use Emacs online help facility to look up help on these commands.

emacspeak-ocr-mode provides the necessary functionality to scan, OCR, read and save documents. By default, scanned images and the resulting text are saved under directory ~/ocr; see variable emacspeak-ocr-working-directory. Invoking command emacspeak-ocr-open-working-directory bound to M-x emacspeak-ocr-open-working-directory will open this directory.

By default, the document being scanned is named `untitled'. You can name the document by using command emacspeak-ocr-name-document bound to M-x emacspeak-ocr-name-document. The document name is used in constructing the name of the image and text files.

Here is a list of all emacspeak OCR commands along with their key-bindings:

key binding --- -------

9 emacspeak-ocr-page 8 emacspeak-ocr-page 7 emacspeak-ocr-page 6 emacspeak-ocr-page 5 emacspeak-ocr-page 4 emacspeak-ocr-page 3 emacspeak-ocr-page 2 emacspeak-ocr-page 1 emacspeak-ocr-page C emacspeak-ocr-set-compress-image-options I emacspeak-ocr-set-scan-image-options SPC emacspeak-ocr-read-current-page s emacspeak-ocr-save-current-page p emacspeak-ocr-page ] emacspeak-ocr-forward-page [ emacspeak-ocr-backward-page d emacspeak-ocr-open-working-directory n emacspeak-ocr-name-document o emacspeak-ocr-recognize-image j emacspeak-ocr-scan-photo i emacspeak-ocr-scan-image RET emacspeak-ocr-scan-and-recognize w emacspeak-ocr-write-document q bury-buffer c emacspeak-ocr-customize ? describe-mode

In addition to any hooks its parent mode `text-mode' might have run, this mode runs the hook `emacspeak-ocr-mode-hook', as the final step during initialization.

emacspeak-ocr-name-document: (NAME)
Name document being scanned in the current OCR buffer. Pick a short but meaningful name.

emacspeak-ocr-open-working-directory: ()
Launch dired on OCR workng directory.

emacspeak-ocr-page: ()
Move to specified page.

emacspeak-ocr-read-current-page: ()
Speaks current page.

emacspeak-ocr-recognize-image: ()
Run OCR engine on current image. Prompts for image file if file corresponding to the expected `current page' is not found.

emacspeak-ocr-save-current-page: ()
Writes out recognized text from current page to an appropriately named file.

emacspeak-ocr-scan-and-recognize: ()
Scan in a page and run OCR engine on it. Use this command once you've verified that the separate steps of acquiring an image and running the OCR engine work corectly by themselves.

emacspeak-ocr-scan-image: ()
Acquire page image.

emacspeak-ocr-scan-photo: (&optional METADATA)
Scan in a photograph. The scanned image is converted to JPEG.

emacspeak-ocr-set-compress-image-options: (SETTING)
Interactively update image compression options. Prompts with current setting in the minibuffer. Setting persists for current Emacs session.

emacspeak-ocr-set-scan-image-options: (SETTING)
Interactively update scan image options. Prompts with current setting in the minibuffer. Setting persists for current Emacs session.

emacspeak-ocr-toggle-read-only: ()
Toggle read-only state of OCR buffer.

emacspeak-ocr-write-document: ()
Writes out recognized text from all pages in current document.


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10.39 emacspeak-outline

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-outline.

emacspeak-outline-speak-backward-heading: ()
Analogous to outline-backward-same-level except that the outline section is optionally spoken

emacspeak-outline-speak-forward-heading: ()
Analogous to outline-forward-same-level, except that the outline section is optionally spoken

emacspeak-outline-speak-next-heading: ()
Analogous to outline-next-visible-heading, except that the outline section is optionally spoken

emacspeak-outline-speak-previous-heading: ()
Analogous to outline-previous-visible-heading, except that the outline section is optionally spoken

emacspeak-outline-speak-this-heading: ()
Speak current outline section starting from point


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10.40 emacspeak-pronounce

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-pronounce.

emacspeak-pronounce-clear-dictionaries: ()
Clear all current pronunciation dictionaries.

emacspeak-pronounce-define-local-pronunciation: (WORD PRONUNCIATION)
control e meta b

Define buffer local pronounciation. Argument WORD specifies the word which should be pronounced as specified by PRONUNCIATION.

emacspeak-pronounce-define-pronunciation: ()
Interactively define entries in the pronunciation dictionaries. Default term to define is delimited by region. First loads any persistent dictionaries if not already loaded.

emacspeak-pronounce-dispatch: ()
control e meta d

Provides the user interface front-end to Emacspeak's pronunciation dictionaries.

emacspeak-pronounce-edit-pronunciations: (KEY)
Prompt for and launch a pronunciation editor on the specified pronunciation dictionary key.

emacspeak-pronounce-load-dictionaries: (&optional FILENAME)
Load pronunciation dictionaries. Optional argument FILENAME specifies the dictionary file.

emacspeak-pronounce-refresh-pronunciations: ()
Refresh pronunciation table for current buffer. Activates pronunciation dictionaries if not already active.

emacspeak-pronounce-save-dictionaries: ()
Writes out the persistent emacspeak pronunciation dictionaries.

emacspeak-pronounce-toggle-use-of-dictionaries: (&optional STATE)
Toggle use of pronunciation dictionaries in current buffer. Pronunciations can be dfined on a per file, per directory and/or per mode basis. Pronunciations are activated on a per buffer basis. Turning on the use of pronunciation dictionaries results in emacspeak composing a pronunciation table based on the currently defined pronunciation dictionaries. After this, the pronunciations will be applied whenever text in the buffer is spoken. Optional argument state can be used from Lisp programs to explicitly turn pronunciations on or off.

emacspeak-pronounce-yank-word: ()
Yank word at point into minibuffer.


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10.41 emacspeak-psgml

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-psgml.

emacspeak-psgml-speak-current-element: ()
Speak contents of current element.

emacspeak-psgml-summarize-element: ()
Context-sensitive element summarizer.

emacspeak-psgml-toggle-interactive-voice-locking: ()
Toggles variable sgml-set-face. When turned on, the buffer is voice locked interactively. Leave this off in general while editting.

emacspeak-xml-browse-mode: ()
Mode for browsing XML documents.

Uses keymap "emacspeak-xml-browse-mode", which is not currently defined.

In addition to any hooks its parent mode `xml-mode' might have run, this mode runs the hook `emacspeak-xml-browse-mode-hook', as the final step during initialization.


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10.42 emacspeak-python

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-python.

emacspeak-py-next-block: ()
Move forward to the beginning of the next block.

emacspeak-py-previous-block: ()
Move backward to the beginning of the current block. If already at the beginning then move to previous block.


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10.43 emacspeak-realaudio

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-realaudio.

emacspeak-realaudio: (&optional IGNORED)
control e ;

Start or control streaming audio including MP3 and realaudio. If using `TRPlayer' as the player, accepts trplayer control commands if a stream is already playing. Otherwise, the playing stream is simply stopped. If no stream is playing, this command prompts for a realaudio resource. Realaudio resources can be specified either as a Realaudio URL, the location of a local Realaudio file, or as the name of a local Realaudio metafile. Realaudio resources you have played in this session are available in the minibuffer history. The default is to play the resource you played most recently. Emacspeak uses the contents of the directory specified by variable emacspeak-realaudio-shortcuts-directory to offer a set of completions. Hit space to use this completion list.

If using TRPlayer, you can either give one-shot commands using command emacspeak-realaudio available from anywhere on the audio desktop as `C-e ;'. Alternatively, switch to buffer *realaudo* using `C-e ;;' if you wish to issue many navigation commands. Note that buffer *realaudio* uses a special major mode that provides the various navigation commands via single keystrokes.

emacspeak-realaudio-browse: (RAMFILE &optional START-TIME)
Browse RAM file before playing the selected component.

emacspeak-realaudio-mode: ()
Major mode for streaming audio.

key binding --- -------

<right> emacspeak-aumix-wave-increase <left> emacspeak-aumix-wave-decrease } emacspeak-realaudio-trplayer-call-command { emacspeak-realaudio-trplayer-call-command ] emacspeak-realaudio-trplayer-call-command [ emacspeak-realaudio-trplayer-call-command 9 emacspeak-realaudio-trplayer-call-command 0 emacspeak-realaudio-trplayer-call-command , emacspeak-realaudio-trplayer-call-command . emacspeak-realaudio-trplayer-call-command > emacspeak-realaudio-trplayer-call-command < emacspeak-realaudio-trplayer-call-command i emacspeak-realaudio-trplayer-call-command l emacspeak-realaudio-trplayer-call-command e emacspeak-realaudio-trplayer-call-command s emacspeak-realaudio-trplayer-call-command t emacspeak-realaudio-trplayer-call-command p emacspeak-realaudio-trplayer-call-command

This mode runs the hook `emacspeak-realaudio-mode-hook', as the final step during initialization.

emacspeak-realaudio-play: (RESOURCE &optional PROMPT-TIME)
Play a realaudio stream. Uses files from your Realaudio shortcuts directory for completion. See documentation for user configurable variable emacspeak-realaudio-shortcuts-directory.

emacspeak-realaudio-play-url-at-point: (&optional PROMPT-TIME)
Play url under point as realaudio

emacspeak-realaudio-select-realaudio-buffer: ()
Switch to realaudio buffer.

emacspeak-realaudio-stop: ()
Stop playing realaudio

emacspeak-realaudio-trplayer-call-command: ()
Call appropriate TRPlayer command.

emacspeak-realaudio-trplayer-command: (CHAR)
Execute TRPlayer command.

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.


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10.44 emacspeak-redefine

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-redefine.

emacspeak-backward-char: (ARG)
control b <left>

Backward-char redefined to speak char moved to.

emacspeak-forward-char: (ARG)
control f <right>

Forward-char redefined to speak char moved to.

emacspeak-kill-buffer: (BUFFER)
control x k

Speech-enabled version of kill-buffer for Emacs 21.

emacspeak-self-insert-command: (ARG)
Character set JISX0213-2 Character set Tibetan 2 column Character set Indian 2 Column Character set CNS11643-7 (Chinese traditional): ISO-IR-187 Character set CNS11643-6 (Chinese traditional): ISO-IR-186 Character set CNS11643-5 (Chinese traditional): ISO-IR-185 Character set CNS11643-4 (Chinese traditional): ISO-IR-184 Character set CNS11643-3 (Chinese traditional): ISO-IR-183 Character set Ethiopic characters Character set Unicode subset ( cap U +0100.. cap U +24FF) Character set Unicode subset ( cap U +E000+FFFF) Character set Unicode subset ( cap U +2500.. cap U +33FF) Character set Tibetan 1 column Character set Indian 1 Column Character set Indian IS 13194 Character set Arabic 2-column Character set Lao Character set ASCII with right-to-left direction Character set Arabic 1-column Character set Arabic digit Character set VISCII upper-case Character set VISCII lower-case Character set IPA Character set SiSheng (PinYin/ZhuYin) Character set Big5 (Level-2) C940-FEFE Character set Big5 (Level-1) A141-C67F Character set JISX0213-1 Character set CNS11643-2 (Chinese traditional): ISO-IR-172 Character set CNS11643-1 (Chinese traditional): ISO-IR-171 Character set JISX0212 (Japanese): ISO-IR-159 Character set KSC5601 (Korean): ISO-IR-149 Character set JISX0208.1983/1990 (Japanese): ISO-IR-87 Character set GB2312: ISO-IR-58 Character set JISX0208.1978 (Japanese): ISO-IR-42 Character set RHP of Latin-8 (ISO 8859-14) Character set RHP of Latin-9 (ISO 8859-15): ISO-IR-203 Character set RHP of Latin-5 (ISO 8859-9): ISO-IR-148 Character set RHP of Cyrillic (ISO 8859-5): ISO-IR-144 Character set Japanese Roman (JISX0201.1976) Character set Japanese Katakana (JISX0201.1976) Character set RHP of Hebrew (ISO 8859-8): ISO-IR-138 Character set RHP of Arabic (ISO 8859-6): ISO-IR-127 Character set RHP of Greek (ISO 8859-7): ISO-IR-126 Character set RHP of Thai (TIS620): ISO-IR-166 Character set RHP of Latin-4 (ISO 8859-4): ISO-IR-110 Character set RHP of Latin-3 (ISO 8859-3): ISO-IR-109 Character set RHP of Latin-2 (ISO 8859-2): ISO-IR-101 Character set RHP of Latin-1 (ISO 8859-1): ISO-IR-100 ~ } | { z y x w v u t s r q p o n m l k j i h g f e d c b a ` _ ^ ] \ [ cap Z cap Y cap X cap W cap V cap U cap T cap S cap R cap Q cap P cap O cap N cap M cap L cap K cap J cap I cap H cap G cap F cap E cap D cap C cap B cap A @ ? > = < ; : 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 0 / . - , + * ) ( ' & % $ # ! SPACE

Insert a character. Speaks the character if emacspeak-character-echo is true. See command emacspeak-toggle-word-echo bound to C-e d w. Toggle variable dtk-stop-immediately-while-typing if you want to have speech flush as you type.


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10.45 emacspeak-remote

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-remote.

emacspeak-remote-connect-to-server: (HOST PORT)
control e meta r

Connect to and start using remote speech server running on host host and listening on port port. Host is the hostname of the remote server, typically the desktop machine. Port is the tcp port that that host is listening on for speech requests.

emacspeak-remote-quick-connect-to-server: ()
Connect to remote server. Does not prompt for host or port, but quietly uses the guesses that appear as defaults when prompting. Use this once you are sure the guesses are usually correct.

emacspeak-remote-ssh-to-server: (LOGIN)
Open ssh session to where we came from.


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10.46 emacspeak-rmail

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-rmail.

emacspeak-rmail-speak-current-message-labels: ()
Speak labels of current message

emacspeak-rmail-summarize-current-message: ()
Summarize current message


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10.47 emacspeak-solitaire

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-solitaire.

emacspeak-solitaire-show-column: ()
Display current row auditorallly

emacspeak-solitaire-show-row: ()
Display current row auditorallly

emacspeak-solitaire-speak-coordinates: ()
Speak coordinates of current position


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10.48 emacspeak-sounds

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-sounds.

emacspeak-play-all-icons: ()
Plays all defined icons and speaks their names.

emacspeak-set-auditory-icon-player: (PLAYER)
control e meta a

Select player used for producing auditory icons. Recommended choices:

emacspeak-serve-auditory-icon for the wave device. emacspeak-midi-icon for midi device.

emacspeak-sounds-reset-local-player: ()
Ask Emacspeak to use a local audio player. This lets me have Emacspeak switch to using audioplay on solaris after I've used it for a while from a remote session where it would use the more primitive speech-server based audio player.

emacspeak-sounds-select-theme: (THEME)
control e )

Select theme for auditory icons.

emacspeak-toggle-auditory-icons: (&optional PREFIX)
control e control a

Toggle use of auditory icons. Optional interactive PREFIX arg toggles global value.


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10.49 emacspeak-speak

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-speak.

emacspeak-audio-annotate-paragraphs: (&optional PREFIX)
Set property auditory-icon at front of all paragraphs. Interactive PREFIX arg prompts for sound cue to use

emacspeak-blink-matching-open: ()
Display matching delimiter in the minibuffer.

emacspeak-completions-move-to-completion-group: ()
Move to group of choices beginning with character last typed. If no such group exists, then we dont move.

emacspeak-dial-dtk: (NUMBER)
control e d t

Prompt for and dial a phone NUMBER with the Dectalk.

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.

emacspeak-dtk-speak-version: ()
control e d cap V

Use this to find out which version of the Dectalk firmware you are running.

emacspeak-execute-repeatedly: (COMMAND)
Execute COMMAND repeatedly.

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.

emacspeak-mark-backward-mark: ()
<control up>

Cycle backward through the mark ring.

emacspeak-mark-forward-mark: ()
<control down>

Cycle forward through the mark ring.

emacspeak-owindow-next-line: (COUNT)
ESCAPE <down>

Move to the next line in the other window and speak it. Numeric prefix arg COUNT can specify number of lines to move.

emacspeak-owindow-previous-line: (COUNT)
ESCAPE <up>

Move to the next line in the other window and speak it. Numeric prefix arg COUNT specifies number of lines to move.

emacspeak-owindow-scroll-down: ()
ESCAPE <prior>

Scroll down the window that command `other-window' would move to. Speak the window contents after scrolling.

emacspeak-owindow-scroll-up: ()
ESCAPE <next>

Scroll up the window that command `other-window' would move to. Speak the window contents after scrolling.

emacspeak-owindow-speak-line: ()
ESCAPE <select>

Speak the current line in the other window.

emacspeak-read-next-line: (&optional ARG)
control e <down>

Read next line, specified by an offset, without moving. Default is to read the next line.

emacspeak-read-next-word: (&optional ARG)
Read next word, specified as a numeric arg, without moving. Default is to read the next word.

emacspeak-read-previous-line: (&optional ARG)
control e <up>

Read previous line, specified by an offset, without moving. Default is to read the previous line.

emacspeak-read-previous-word: (&optional ARG)
Read previous word, specified as a prefix arg, without moving. Default is to read the previous word.

emacspeak-speak-and-skip-extent-upto-char: (CHAR)
Search forward from point until we hit char. Speak text between point and the char we hit.

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.

emacspeak-speak-and-skip-extent-upto-this-char: ()
Speak extent delimited by point and last character typed.

emacspeak-speak-browse-buffer: (&optional DEFINE-PARAGRAPH)
control e ,

Browse the current buffer by reading it a paragraph at a time. Optional interactive prefix arg define-paragraph prompts for regexp that defines paragraph start and paragraph-separate.

emacspeak-speak-buffer: (&optional ARG)
control e b

Speak current buffer contents. With prefix ARG, speaks the rest of the buffer from point. Negative prefix arg speaks from start of buffer to point. If voice lock mode is on, the paragraphs in the buffer are voice annotated first, see command `emacspeak-speak-voice-annotate-paragraphs'.

emacspeak-speak-buffer-filename: (&optional FILENAME)
control e f

Speak name of file being visited in current buffer. Speak default directory if invoked in a dired buffer, or when the buffer is not visiting any file. Interactive prefix arg `filename' speaks only the final path component. The result is put in the kill ring for convenience.

emacspeak-speak-buffer-interactively: ()
control e cap B

Speak the start of, rest of, or the entire buffer. 's' to speak the start. 'r' to speak the rest. any other key to speak entire buffer.

emacspeak-speak-char: (&optional PREFIX)
control e c

Speak character under point. Pronounces character phonetically unless called with a PREFIX arg.

emacspeak-speak-completions: ()
Speak completions buffer if one present.

emacspeak-speak-continuously: ()
control e RETURN

Speak a buffer continuously. First prompts using the minibuffer for the kind of action to perform after speaking each chunk. E.G. speak a line at a time etc. Speaking commences at current buffer position. Pressing C-g breaks out, leaving point on last chunk that was spoken. Any other key continues to speak the buffer.

emacspeak-speak-current-column: ()
control e =

Speak the current column.

emacspeak-speak-current-kill: (COUNT)
control e k

Speak the current kill entry. This is the text that will be yanked in by the next C-y. Prefix numeric arg, COUNT, specifies that the text that will be yanked as a result of a C-y followed by count-1 M-y be spoken. The kill number that is spoken says what numeric prefix arg to give to command yank.

emacspeak-speak-current-mark: (COUNT)
control e control @

Speak the line containing the mark. With no argument, speaks the line containing the mark--this is where `exchange-point-and-mark' C-x C-x would jump. Numeric prefix arg 'COUNT' speaks line containing mark 'n' where 'n' is one less than the number of times one has to jump using `set-mark-command' to get to this marked position. The location of the mark is indicated by an aural highlight achieved by a change in voice personality.

emacspeak-speak-current-percentage: ()
control e %

Announce the percentage into the current buffer.

emacspeak-speak-current-window: ()
Speak contents of current window. Speaks entire window irrespective of point.

emacspeak-speak-display-char: (&optional PREFIX)
Display char under point using current speech display table. Behavior is the same as command `emacspeak-speak-char' bound to C-e c for characters in the range 0--127. Optional argument PREFIX specifies that the character should be spoken phonetically.

emacspeak-speak-front-of-buffer: ()
Speak the buffer from start to point

emacspeak-speak-help: (&optional ARG)
control e h

Speak help buffer if one present. With prefix arg, speaks the rest of the buffer from point. Negative prefix arg speaks from start of buffer to point.

emacspeak-speak-help-interactively: ()
Speak the start of, rest of, or the entire help. 's' to speak the start. 'r' to speak the rest. any other key to speak entire help.

emacspeak-speak-line: (&optional ARG)
control e l

Speaks current line. With prefix ARG, speaks the rest of the line from point. Negative prefix optional arg speaks from start of line to point. Voicifies if option `voice-lock-mode' is on. Indicates indentation with a tone if audio indentation is in use. Indicates position of point with an aural highlight if option `emacspeak-show-point' is turned on --see command `emacspeak-show-point' bound to M-x emacspeak-show-point. Lines that start hidden blocks of text, e.g. outline header lines, or header lines of blocks created by command `emacspeak-hide-or-expose-block' are indicated with auditory icon ellipses.

emacspeak-speak-line-interactively: ()
control e cap L

Speak the start of, rest of, or the entire line. 's' to speak the start. 'r' to speak the rest. any other key to speak entire line.

emacspeak-speak-line-number: ()
control e control l

Print the current buffer line number and narrowed line number of point.

emacspeak-speak-line-number-obselete: ()
Speak the line number of the current line.

emacspeak-speak-line-set-column-filter: (FILTER)
control e |

Set up filter for selectively speaking or ignoring portions of lines. The filter is specified as a list of pairs. For example, to filter columns 1 -- 10 and 20 -- 25, specify filter as ((0 9) (20 25)). Filter settings are persisted across sessions. A persisted filter is used as the default when prompting for a filter. This allows one to accumulate a set of filters for specific files like /var/adm/messages and /var/adm/maillog over time. Option emacspeak-speak-line-invert-filter determines the sense of the filter.

emacspeak-speak-message-again: (&optional FROM-MESSAGE-CACHE)
control e a

Speak the last message from Emacs once again. Optional interactive prefix arg `from-message-cache' speaks message cached from the most recent call to function `message'.

emacspeak-speak-message-at-time: (TIME MESSAGE)
control e @

Set up rin-at-time to speak message at specified time. Provides simple stop watch functionality in addition to other things. See documentation for command run-at-time for details on time-spec.

emacspeak-speak-minibuffer: (&optional ARG)
Speak the minibuffer contents With prefix arg, speaks the rest of the buffer from point. Negative prefix arg speaks from start of buffer to point.

emacspeak-speak-minor-mode-line: ()
control e cap M

Speak the minor mode-information.

emacspeak-speak-mode-line: ()
control e m

Speak the mode-line.

emacspeak-speak-next-field: ()
control e >

Skip across and speak the next contiguous sequence of non-blank characters. Useful in moving across fields. Will be improved if it proves useful.

emacspeak-speak-next-window: ()
control e control n

Speak the next window.

emacspeak-speak-other-window: (&optional ARG)
Speak contents of `other' window. Speaks entire window irrespective of point. Semantics of `other' is the same as for the builtin Emacs command `other-window'. Optional argument ARG specifies `other' window to speak.

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.

emacspeak-speak-page: (&optional ARG)
control e [

Speak a page. With prefix ARG, speaks rest of current page. Negative prefix arg will read from start of current page to point. If option `voice-lock-mode' is on, then it will use any defined personality.

emacspeak-speak-page-interactively: ()
control e ]

Speak the start of, rest of, or the entire page. 's' to speak the start. 'r' to speak the rest. any other key to speak entire page.

emacspeak-speak-paragraph: (&optional ARG)
control e {

Speak paragraph. With prefix arg, speaks rest of current paragraph. Negative prefix arg will read from start of current paragraph to point. If voice-lock-mode is on, then it will use any defined personality.

emacspeak-speak-paragraph-interactively: ()
control e cap P

Speak the start of, rest of, or the entire paragraph. 's' to speak the start. 'r' to speak the rest. any other key to speak entire paragraph.

emacspeak-speak-predefined-window: (&optional ARG)
control e 9 control e 8 control e 7 control e 6 control e 5 control e 4 control e 3 control e 2 control e 1 control e 0

Speak one of the first 10 windows on the screen. Speaks entire window irrespective of point. In general, you'll never have Emacs split the screen into more than two or three. Argument ARG determines the 'other' window to speak. Semantics of `other' is the same as for the builtin Emacs command `other-window'.

emacspeak-speak-previous-field: ()
control e <

Skip backwards across and speak contiguous sequence of non-blank characters. Useful in moving across fields. Will be improved if it proves useful.

emacspeak-speak-previous-window: ()
control e control p

Speak the previous window.

emacspeak-speak-rectangle: (START END)
control e cap R

Speak a rectangle of text. Rectangle is delimited by point and mark. When call from a program, arguments specify the START and END of the rectangle.

emacspeak-speak-region: (START END)
control e r

Speak region. Argument START and END specify region to speak.

emacspeak-speak-rest-of-buffer: ()
control e n

Speak remainder of the buffer starting at point

emacspeak-speak-sentence: (&optional ARG)
Speak current sentence. With prefix ARG, speaks the rest of the sentence from point. Negative prefix arg speaks from start of sentence to point.

emacspeak-speak-set-display-table: (&optional PREFIX)
Sets up buffer specific speech display table that controls how special characters are spoken. Interactive prefix argument causes setting to be global.

emacspeak-speak-sexp: (&optional ARG)
control e '

Speak current sexp. With prefix ARG, speaks the rest of the sexp from point. Negative prefix arg speaks from start of sexp to point. If option `voice-lock-mode' is on, then uses the personality.

emacspeak-speak-sexp-interactively: ()
control e "

Speak the start of, rest of, or the entire sexp. 's' to speak the start. 'r' to speak the rest. any other key to speak entire sexp.

emacspeak-speak-skim-buffer: ()
Skim the current buffer a paragraph at a time.

emacspeak-speak-skim-next-paragraph: ()
Skim next paragraph.

emacspeak-speak-skim-paragraph: ()
Skim paragraph. Skimming a paragraph results in the speech speeding up after the first clause. Speech is scaled by the value of dtk-speak-skim-scale

emacspeak-speak-spaces-at-point: ()
control e CONTROL meta @

Speak the white space at point.

emacspeak-speak-spell-current-word: ()
control e cap W

Spell word at point.

emacspeak-speak-time: ()
control e t

Speak the time.

emacspeak-speak-version: ()
control e cap V

Announce version information for running emacspeak.

emacspeak-speak-voice-annotate-paragraphs: ()
Locate paragraphs and voice annotate the first word. Here, paragraph is taken to mean a chunk of text preceeded by a blank line. Useful to do this before you listen to an entire buffer.

emacspeak-speak-window-information: ()
control e control w

Speaks information about current window.

emacspeak-speak-word: (&optional ARG)
control e w

Speak current word. With prefix ARG, speaks the rest of the word from point. Negative prefix arg speaks from start of word to point. If executed on the same buffer position a second time, the word is spelt instead of being spoken.

emacspeak-speak-word-interactively: ()
Speak the start of, rest of, or the entire word. 's' to speak the start. 'r' to speak the rest. any other key to speak entire word.

emacspeak-switch-to-completions-window: ()
Jump to the *Completions* buffer if it is active. We make the current minibuffer contents (which is obviously the prefix for each entry in the completions buffer) inaudible to reduce chatter.

emacspeak-toggle-action-mode: (&optional PREFIX)
Toggle state of Emacspeak action mode. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.

emacspeak-toggle-audio-indentation: (&optional PREFIX)
control e d i

Toggle state of Emacspeak audio indentation. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result. Specifying the method of indentation as `tones' results in the Dectalk producing a tone whose length is a function of the line's indentation. Specifying `speak' results in the number of initial spaces being spoken.

emacspeak-toggle-character-echo: (&optional PREFIX)
control e d k

Toggle state of Emacspeak character echo. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.

emacspeak-toggle-comint-autospeak: (&optional PREFIX)
control e control q

Toggle state of Emacspeak comint autospeak. When turned on, comint output is automatically spoken. Turn this on if you want your shell to speak its results. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.

emacspeak-toggle-comint-output-monitor: (&optional PREFIX)
control e o

Toggle state of Emacspeak comint monitor. When turned on, comint output is automatically spoken. Turn this on if you want your shell to speak its results. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.

emacspeak-toggle-line-echo: (&optional PREFIX)
control e d l

Toggle state of Emacspeak line echo. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.

emacspeak-toggle-mail-alert: (&optional PREFIX)
control e meta m

Toggle state of Emacspeak mail alert. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result. Turning on this option results in Emacspeak producing an auditory icon indicating the arrival of new mail when displaying the mode line.

emacspeak-toggle-show-point: (&optional PREFIX)
control e control d

Toggle state of Emacspeak-show-point. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.

emacspeak-toggle-speak-line-invert-filter: (&optional PREFIX)
control e \

Toggle state of how column filter is interpreted. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.

emacspeak-toggle-speak-messages: ()
control e q

Toggle the state of whether emacspeak echoes messages.

emacspeak-toggle-which-function: (&optional PREFIX)
control e meta w

Toggle state of Emacspeak which function mode. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.

emacspeak-toggle-word-echo: (&optional PREFIX)
control e d w

Toggle state of Emacspeak word echo. Interactive PREFIX arg means toggle the global default value, and then set the current local value to the result.

emacspeak-use-customized-blink-paren: ()
A customized blink-paren to speak matching opening paren. We need to call this in case Emacs is anal and loads its own builtin blink-paren function which does not talk.

emacspeak-view-register: ()
control e v

Display the contents of a register, and then speak it.

emacspeak-voicify-rectangle: (START END &optional PERSONALITY)
Voicify the current rectangle. When calling from a program,arguments are START END personality Prompts for PERSONALITY with completion when called interactively.

emacspeak-voicify-region: (START END &optional PERSONALITY)
Voicify the current region. When calling from a program,arguments are START END personality. Prompts for PERSONALITY with completion when called interactively.

emacspeak-zap-tts: ()
control e d z

Send this command to the TTS directly.


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10.50 emacspeak-speedbar

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-speedbar.

emacspeak-speedbar-click: ()
Does the equivalent of the mouse click from the keyboard

emacspeak-speedbar-goto-speedbar: ()
Switch to the speedbar


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10.51 emacspeak-table-ui

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-table-ui.

emacspeak-table-copy-current-element-to-register: (REGISTER)
Speak current table element

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.

emacspeak-table-copy-to-clipboard: ()
Copy table in current buffer to the table clipboard. Current buffer must be in emacspeak-table mode.

emacspeak-table-display-table-in-region: (START END)
control e TAB

Recognize tabular data in current region and display it in table browsing mode in a a separate buffer. emacspeak table mode is designed to let you browse tabular data using all the power of the two-dimensional spatial layout while giving you sufficient contextual information. The tables subdirectory of the emacspeak distribution contains some sample tables --these are the CalTrain schedules. Execute command `describe-mode' bound to C-h m in a buffer that is in emacspeak table mode to read the documentation on the table browser.

emacspeak-table-find-csv-file: (FILENAME)
Process a csv (comma separated values) file. The processed data and presented using emacspeak table navigation.

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.

emacspeak-table-find-file: (FILENAME)
control e control t

Open a file containing table data and display it in table mode. emacspeak table mode is designed to let you browse tabular data using all the power of the two-dimensional spatial layout while giving you sufficient contextual information. The etc/tables subdirectory of the emacspeak distribution contains some sample tables --these are the CalTrain schedules. Execute command `describe-mode' bound to C-h m in a buffer that is in emacspeak table mode to read the documentation on the table browser.

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.

emacspeak-table-get-entry-with-headers: (ROW COLUMN &optional ROW-HEAD-P COL-HEAD-P)
Return both row and column header and table element

emacspeak-table-goto: (ROW COLUMN)
Prompt for a table cell coordinates and jump to it.

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.

emacspeak-table-goto-bottom: ()
Goes to the bottom of the current column.

emacspeak-table-goto-left: ()
Goes to the left of the current row.

emacspeak-table-goto-right: ()
Goes to the right of the current row.

emacspeak-table-goto-top: ()
Goes to the top of the current column.

emacspeak-table-next-column: (&optional COUNT)
Move to the next column if possible

emacspeak-table-next-row: (&optional COUNT)
Move to the next row if possible

emacspeak-table-paste-from-clipboard: ()
Paste the emacspeak table clipboard into the current buffer. Use the major mode of this buffer to decide what kind of table markup to use.

emacspeak-table-previous-column: (&optional COUNT)
Move to the previous column if possible

emacspeak-table-previous-row: (&optional COUNT)
Move to the previous row if possible

emacspeak-table-search: ()
Search the table for matching elements. Interactively prompts for row or column to search and pattern to look for. If there is a match, makes the matching cell current.

emacspeak-table-search-headers: ()
Search the table row or column headers. Interactively prompts for row or column to search and pattern to look for. If there is a match, makes the matching row or column current.

emacspeak-table-select-automatic-speaking-method: ()
Interactively select the kind of automatic speech to produce when browsing table elements

emacspeak-table-sort-on-current-column: ()
Sort table on current column.

emacspeak-table-speak-both-headers-and-element: ()
Speak both row and column header and table element

emacspeak-table-speak-column-filtered: (&optional PREFIX)
Speaks a table column after applying a specified column filter. Optional prefix arg prompts for a new filter.

emacspeak-table-speak-column-header-and-element: ()
Speak column header and table element

emacspeak-table-speak-coordinates: ()
Speak current table coordinates.

emacspeak-table-speak-current-element: ()
Speak current table element

emacspeak-table-speak-dimensions: ()
Speak current table dimensions.

emacspeak-table-speak-row-filtered: (&optional PREFIX)
Speaks a table row after applying a specified row filter. Optional prefix arg prompts for a new filter.

emacspeak-table-speak-row-header-and-element: ()
Speak row header and table element

emacspeak-table-ui-filter-load: (FILE)
Load saved filter settings.

emacspeak-table-ui-filter-save: (FILE)
Save out filter settings.

emacspeak-table-view-csv-buffer: (&optional BUFFER-NAME)
Process a csv (comma separated values) data. The processed data and presented using emacspeak table navigation.


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10.52 emacspeak-tabulate

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-tabulate.

emacspeak-tabulate-region: (START END &optional MARK-FIELDS)
control e i

Voicifies the white-space of a table if one found. Optional interactive prefix arg mark-fields specifies if the header row information is used to mark fields in the white-space.


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10.53 emacspeak-tapestry

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-tapestry.

emacspeak-tapestry-describe-tapestry: ()
control e meta t

Describe the current layout of visible buffers in current frame.


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10.54 emacspeak-tar

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-tar.

emacspeak-tar-speak-file-date: ()
Speak date of file current entry

emacspeak-tar-speak-file-permissions: ()
Speak permissions of file current entry

emacspeak-tar-speak-file-size: ()
Speak size of file current entry


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10.55 emacspeak-tetris

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-tetris.

emacspeak-tetris-goto-bottom-row: ()
Move to and speak bottom row

emacspeak-tetris-goto-top-row: ()
Move to and speak the top row

emacspeak-tetris-speak-column: (&optional X)
Speak column --default is to speak current column

emacspeak-tetris-speak-coordinates: ()
Speak current position

emacspeak-tetris-speak-current-shape: ()
Speak current shape

emacspeak-tetris-speak-current-shape-and-coordinates: ()
Speak shape orientation and coordinates

emacspeak-tetris-speak-next-shape: ()
Speak next shape

emacspeak-tetris-speak-row: ()
Speak current tetris row

emacspeak-tetris-speak-row-number: ()
Speak where on the tetris board we are

emacspeak-tetris-speak-score: ()
Speak the score

emacspeak-tetris-speak-x-coordinate: ()
Speak current position


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10.56 emacspeak-tnt

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-tnt.

emacspeak-tnt-toggle-autospeak: (&optional PREFIX)
Toggle TNT autospeak for this chat session.


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10.57 emacspeak-url-template

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-url-template.

emacspeak-url-template-fetch: (&optional DOCUMENTATION)
control e u

Fetch a pre-defined resource. Use Emacs completion to obtain a list of available resources. Resources typically prompt for the relevant information before completing the request. Optional interactive prefix arg displays documentation for specified resource.

emacspeak-url-template-help: ()
Display documentation for a URL template. Use Emacs completion to obtain a list of available resources.

emacspeak-url-template-load: (FILE)
Load URL template resources from specified location.

emacspeak-url-template-nfl-play-broadcast: ()
Play NFL url under point.

emacspeak-url-template-save: (FILE)
Save out url templates.


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10.58 emacspeak-view

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-view.

emacspeak-view-line-to-top: ()
Moves current line to top of window


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10.59 emacspeak-view-process

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-view-process.

emacspeak-view-process-goto-current-field-next-line: ()
Set point to the current field in the next line.

emacspeak-view-process-speak-current-field: ()
Speak current field


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10.60 emacspeak-vm

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-vm.

emacspeak-vm-browse-message: ()
Browse an email message --read it paragraph at a time.

emacspeak-vm-catch-up-all-messages: ()
Mark all messages in folder to be deleted. Use with caution.

emacspeak-vm-locate-subject-line: ()
Locates the subject line in a message being read. Useful when you're reading a message that has been forwarded multiple times.

emacspeak-vm-mode-line: ()
VM mode line information.

emacspeak-vm-next-button: (N)
Move point to N buttons forward. If N is negative, move backward instead.

emacspeak-vm-speak-labels: ()
Speak a message's labels

emacspeak-vm-yank-header: ()
Yank specified header into kill ring.


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10.61 emacspeak-w3

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-w3.

emacspeak-w3-class-filter-and-follow: (&optional PROMPT-CLASS)
Follow url and point, and filter the result by specified class. Class can be set locally for a buffer, and overridden with an interactive prefix arg. If there is a known rewrite url rule, that is used as well.

emacspeak-w3-count-matches: (PROMPT-URL LOCATOR)
Count matches for locator in HTML.

emacspeak-w3-count-nested-tables: (PROMPT-URL)
Count nested tables in HTML.

emacspeak-w3-count-tables: (PROMPT-URL)
Count tables in HTML.

emacspeak-w3-do-onclick: ()
Do onclick action.

emacspeak-w3-extract-by-class: (CLASS &optional PROMPT-URL SPEAK)
Extract elements having specified class attribute from HTML. Extracts specified elements from current WWW page and displays it in a separate buffer. Optional arg url specifies the page to extract content from. Interactive use provides list of class values as completion.

emacspeak-w3-extract-by-class-list: (CLASSES &optional PROMPT-URL SPEAK)
Extract elements having class specified in list `classes' from HTML. Extracts specified elements from current WWW page and displays it in a separate buffer. Optional arg url specifies the page to extract content from. Interactive use provides list of class values as completion.

emacspeak-w3-extract-nested-table: (TABLE-INDEX &optional PROMPT-URL SPEAK)
Extract nested table specified by `table-index'. Default is to operate on current web page when in a W3 buffer; otherwise `prompt-url' is the URL to process. Prompts for URL when called interactively. Optional arg `speak' specifies if the result should be spoken automatically.

emacspeak-w3-extract-nested-table-list: (TABLES &optional PROMPT-URL SPEAK)
Extract specified list of tables from a WWW page.

emacspeak-w3-extract-node-by-id: (URL NODE-ID)
Extract specified node from URI.

emacspeak-w3-extract-table-by-position: (POSITION &optional PROMPT-URL SPEAK)
Extract table at specified position. Optional arg url specifies the page to extract content from. Interactive prefix arg causes url to be read from the minibuffer.

emacspeak-w3-extract-tables-by-position-list: (POSITIONS &optional PROMPT-URL SPEAK)
Extract specified list of nested tables from a WWW page. Tables are specified by their position in the list nested of tables found in the page.

emacspeak-w3-google-similar-to-this-page: ()
Ask Google to find documents similar to this one.

emacspeak-w3-google-who-links-to-this-page: ()
Perform a google search to locate documents that link to the current page.

emacspeak-w3-javascript-follow-link: ()
Follow URL hidden inside a javascript link

emacspeak-w3-jump-to-submit: ()
Jump to next available submit button.

emacspeak-w3-jump-to-title-in-content: ()
Jumps to the occurrence of document title in page body.

emacspeak-w3-lynx-url-under-point: ()
Display contents of URL under point using LYNX. The document is displayed in a separate buffer. Note that the hyperlinks in that display are not active-- this facility is present only to help me iron out the remaining problems with the table structure extraction code in W3.

emacspeak-w3-next-doc-element: (&optional COUNT)
Move forward to the next document element. Optional interactive prefix argument COUNT specifies by how many eleemnts to move.

emacspeak-w3-preview-this-buffer: ()
Preview this buffer.

emacspeak-w3-preview-this-region: (START END)
Preview this region.

emacspeak-w3-previous-doc-element: (&optional COUNT)
Move back to the previous document element. Optional interactive prefix argument COUNT specifies by how many eleemnts to move.

emacspeak-w3-show-anchor-class: ()
Display any class attributes set on corresponding anchor element.

emacspeak-w3-speak-next-element: ()
Speak next document element.

emacspeak-w3-speak-this-element: ()
Speak document element under point.

emacspeak-w3-toggle-table-borders: ()
Toggle drawing of W3 table borders

emacspeak-w3-url-rewrite-and-follow: (&optional PROMPT)
Apply a url rewrite rule as specified in the current buffer before following link under point. If no rewrite rule is defined, first prompt for one. Rewrite rules are of the form `(from to)' where from and to are strings. Typically, the rewrite rule is automatically set up by Emacspeak tools like websearch where a rewrite rule is known. Rewrite rules are useful in jumping directly to the printer friendly version of an article for example. Optional interactive prefix arg prompts for a rewrite rule even if one is already defined.

emacspeak-w3-xpath-filter-and-follow: (&optional PROMPT)
Follow url and point, and filter the result by specified xpath. XPath can be set locally for a buffer, and overridden with an interactive prefix arg. If there is a known rewrite url rule, that is used as well.

emacspeak-w3-xsl-toggle: ()
Toggle application of XSL transformations. This uses XSLT Processor xsltproc available as part of the libxslt package.

emacspeak-w3-xslt-apply: (XSL)
Apply specified transformation to current page.

emacspeak-w3-xslt-filter: (PATH &optional PROMPT-URL SPEAK-RESULT)
Extract elements matching specified XPath path locator from HTML. Extracts specified elements from current WWW page and displays it in a separate buffer. Optional arg url specifies the page to extract table from.

emacspeak-w3-xslt-select: (XSL)
Select XSL transformation applied to WWW pages before they are displayed .


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10.62 emacspeak-w3search

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-w3search.

emacspeak-websearch-blue-pages: (QUERY &optional PREFIX)
Search IBM Blue Pages

emacspeak-websearch-ibm-internal: (QUERY)
Search IBM My News

emacspeak-websearch-ibm-my-news: (QUERY)
Search IBM My News


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10.63 emacspeak-websearch

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-websearch.

emacspeak-websearch-alltheweb-search: (QUERY &optional PREFIX)
Perform an AllTheWeb search. Optional prefix arg prompts for type of search: --use `all' `phrase' or `any' to specify the type of search.

emacspeak-websearch-altavista-search: (QUERY)
Perform an Altavista search

emacspeak-websearch-amazon-search: ()
Amazon search.

emacspeak-websearch-appwatch-search: (QUERY)
Search AppWatch Site.

emacspeak-websearch-ask-jeeves: (QUERY)
Ask Jeeves for the answer.

emacspeak-websearch-bbc-search: (QUERY)
Search BBC archives.

emacspeak-websearch-biblio-search: (QUERY)
Search Computer Science Bibliographies.

emacspeak-websearch-britannica-search: (QUERY)
Search Encyclopedia Britannica.

emacspeak-websearch-citeseer-search: (TERM)
Perform a CiteSeer search.

emacspeak-websearch-cnn-search: (QUERY &optional PREFIX)
Perform an CNN search. Optional interactive prefix arg prompts for additional search parameters. The default is to sort by date and show summaries. To sort by relevance specify additional parameter &rf=0. To hide summaries, specify additional parameter &lk=2. You can customize the defaults by setting variable emacspeak-websearch-cnn-options to an appropriate string.

emacspeak-websearch-company-news: (TICKER &optional PREFIX)
Perform an company news lookup. Retrieves company news, research, profile, insider trades, or upgrades/downgrades.

emacspeak-websearch-cpan-search: (QUERY)
Search CPAN Comprehensive Perl Archive Network Site.

emacspeak-websearch-ctan-search: (QUERY)
Search CTAN Comprehensive TeX Archive Network Site.

emacspeak-websearch-dictionary-hypertext-webster-search: (QUERY)
Search the Webster Dictionary.

emacspeak-websearch-dispatch: (&optional PREFIX)
control e ?

Launches specific websearch queries. Press `?' to list available search engines. Once selected, the selected searcher prompts for additional information as appropriate. When using W3, this interface attempts to speak the most relevant information on the result page.

emacspeak-websearch-display-form: (FORM-MARKUP)
Display form specified by form-markup.

emacspeak-websearch-ebay-search: ()
Ebay search.

emacspeak-websearch-emacspeak-archive: (QUERY)
control h e

Search Emacspeak mail archives. For example to find messages about Redhat at the Emacspeak archives, type +redhat

emacspeak-websearch-exchange-rate-convertor: ()
Currency convertor.

emacspeak-websearch-fn-cnn-search: (QUERY &optional PREFIX)
Perform an CNN FNsearch. Optional interactive prefix arg prompts for additional search parameters. The default is to sort by date and show summaries. To sort by relevance specify additional parameter &rf=0. To hide summaries, specify additional parameter &lk=2. You can customize the defaults by setting variable emacspeak-websearch-fn-cnn-options to an appropriate string.

emacspeak-websearch-foldoc-search: (QUERY)
Perform a FolDoc search.

emacspeak-websearch-freshmeat-search: (QUERY)
Search Freshmeat Site.

emacspeak-websearch-google: (QUERY &optional LUCKY)
Perform an Google search. Optional interactive prefix arg `lucky' is equivalent to hitting the I'm Feeling Lucky button on Google. Meaning of the `lucky' flag can be inverted by setting option emacspeak-websearch-google-feeling-lucky-p.

emacspeak-websearch-google-advanced: ()
Present Google advanced search form simplified for speech interaction.

emacspeak-websearch-google-feeling-lucky: (QUERY)
Do a I'm Feeling Lucky Google search.

emacspeak-websearch-google-usenet-advanced: ()
Present Google Usenet advanced search form simplified for speech interaction.

emacspeak-websearch-gutenberg: (TYPE QUERY)
Perform an Gutenberg search

emacspeak-websearch-help: ()
Displays key mapping used by Emacspeak Websearch.

emacspeak-websearch-hotbot-search: (QUERY &optional PREFIX)
Perform a Hotbot search. Optional interactive prefix arg prompts for additional search parameters. The default is to sort by date and show summaries. To sort by relevance specify additional parameter &rf=0. To hide summaries, specify additional parameter &lk=2. You can customize the defaults by setting variable emacspeak-websearch-hotbot-options to an appropriate string.

emacspeak-websearch-inference-search: (QUERY)
Perform an Inference search.

emacspeak-websearch-machine-translate: (LANG QUERY)
Perform a machine translation request

emacspeak-websearch-map-directions-search: (QUERY &optional MAP)
Get driving directions from Yahoo. With optional interactive prefix arg MAP shows the location map instead.

emacspeak-websearch-merriam-webster-search: (QUERY)
Search the Merriam Webster Dictionary.

emacspeak-websearch-news-yahoo: (QUERY)
Perform an Yahoo News search

emacspeak-websearch-northern-light: (QUERY)
Perform a Northern Light search

emacspeak-websearch-open-directory-search: (QUERY)
Perform an Open Directory search

emacspeak-websearch-packages-linux: (QUERY)
Search for Linux packages.

emacspeak-websearch-people-yahoo: ()
Perform an Yahoo people search

emacspeak-websearch-quotes-yahoo-search: (QUERY &optional PREFIX)
Perform a Quotes Yahoo . Default tickers to look up is taken from variable emacspeak-websearch-personal-portfolio. Default is to present the data in emacspeak's table browsing mode --optional interactive prefix arg causes data to be displayed y W3 as a WWW page. You can customize the defaults by setting variable emacspeak-websearch-quotes-yahoo-options to an appropriate string.

emacspeak-websearch-real-tuner: ()
Search using Real Tuner from Real Networks.

emacspeak-websearch-recorded-books-search: ()
Present advanced search form for recorded books.

emacspeak-websearch-redhat: (QUERY)
Search RedHat site.

emacspeak-websearch-rpm-find: (QUERY)
Search RPM catalog site.

emacspeak-websearch-shoutcast-search: ()
Ebay search.

emacspeak-websearch-software-search: ()
Search SourceForge, Freshmeat and other sites.

emacspeak-websearch-sourceforge-search: (QUERY)
Search SourceForge Site.

emacspeak-websearch-streaming-audio-search: (QUERY)
Search for streaming audio.

emacspeak-websearch-teoma: (QUERY)
Perform an Teoma search.

emacspeak-websearch-usenet: (GROUP &optional PREFIX)
control e cap U

Prompt and browse a Usenet newsgroup. Optional interactive prefix arg results in prompting for a search term.

emacspeak-websearch-vector-vest-search: (QUERY)
Look up VectorVest reports .

emacspeak-websearch-vickers-search: (QUERY)
Search Vickers insider trading.

emacspeak-websearch-w3c-search: (QUERY)
Search the W3C Site.

emacspeak-websearch-weather: (ZIP)
Get weather forecast for specified zip code.

emacspeak-websearch-yahoo: (QUERY)
Perform an Yahoo search

emacspeak-websearch-yahoo-historical-chart: (TICKER &optional AS-HTML)
Look up historical stock data. Optional second arg as-html processes the results as HTML rather than data.


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10.64 emacspeak-widget

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-widget.

emacspeak-widget-browse-widget-interactively: ()
Allows you to browse a widget

emacspeak-widget-help: ()
Speak help for widget under point.

emacspeak-widget-summarize-parent: ()
Summarize parent of widget at point.

emacspeak-widget-summarize-widget-under-point: (&optional LEVEL)
Summarize a widget if any under point. Optional interactive prefix specifies how many levels to go up from current widget before summarizing.

emacspeak-widget-update-from-minibuffer: (POINT)
Sets widget at point by invoking its prompter.


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10.65 emacspeak-wizards

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-wizards.

emacspeak-annotate-add-annotation: (&optional RESET)
Add annotation to the annotation working buffer. Prompt for annotation buffer if not already set. Interactive prefix arg `reset' prompts for the annotation buffer even if one is already set. Annotation is entered in a temporary buffer and the annotation is inserted into the working buffer when complete.

emacspeak-clipboard-copy: (START END &optional PROMPT)
control e control c

Copy contents of the region to the emacspeak clipboard. Previous contents of the clipboard will be overwritten. The Emacspeak clipboard is a convenient way of sharing information between independent Emacspeak sessions running on the same or different machines. Do not use this for sharing information within an Emacs session --Emacs' register commands are far more efficient and light-weight. Optional interactive prefix arg results in Emacspeak prompting for the clipboard file to use. Argument START and END specifies region. Optional argument PROMPT specifies whether we prompt for the name of a clipboard file.

emacspeak-clipboard-paste: (&optional PASTE-TABLE)
control e control y

Yank contents of the Emacspeak clipboard at point. The Emacspeak clipboard is a convenient way of sharing information between independent Emacspeak sessions running on the same or different machines. Do not use this for sharing information within an Emacs session --Emacs' register commands are far more efficient and light-weight. Optional interactive prefix arg pastes from the emacspeak table clipboard instead.

emacspeak-copy-current-file: ()
control e meta c

Copy file visited in current buffer to new location. Prompts for the new location and preserves modification time when copying. If location is a directory, the file is copied to that directory under its current name ; if location names a file in an existing directory, the specified name is used. Asks for confirmation if the copy will result in an existing file being overwritten.

emacspeak-customize: ()
control e cap C

Customize Emacspeak.

emacspeak-customize-personal-settings: (FILE)
control e <f1>

Create a customization buffer for browsing and updating personal customizations.

emacspeak-cvs-get-anonymous: ()
control e <control down>

Get latest cvs snapshot of emacspeak.

emacspeak-cvs-gnu-get-project-snapshot: (PROJECT)
Grab CVS snapshot of specified project from GNU.

emacspeak-cvs-sf-get-project-snapshot: (PROJECT)
Grab CVS snapshot of specified project from Sourceforge.

emacspeak-emergency-tts-restart: ()
For use in an emergency. Will start TTS engine specified by emacspeak-emergency-tts-server.

emacspeak-frame-label-or-switch-to-labelled-frame: (&optional PREFIX)
control e meta f

Switch to labelled frame. With optional PREFIX argument, label current frame.

emacspeak-frame-read-frame-label: ()
Read a frame label with completion.

emacspeak-generate-documentation: (FILENAME)
Generate docs for all emacspeak commands. Prompts for FILENAME in which to save the documentation. Warning! Contents of file filename will be overwritten.

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.

emacspeak-generate-texinfo-command-documentation: (FILENAME)
Generate texinfo documentation for all emacspeak commands into file commands.texi. Warning! Contents of file commands.texi will be overwritten.

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.

emacspeak-kill-buffer-quietly: ()
Kill current buffer without asking for confirmation.

emacspeak-learn-mode: ()
control e control h

Helps you learn the keys. You can press keys and hear what they do. To leave, press C-g.

emacspeak-link-current-file: ()
control e meta l

Link (hard link) file visited in current buffer to new location. Prompts for the new location and preserves modification time when linking. If location is a directory, the file is copied to that directory under its current name ; if location names a file in an existing directory, the specified name is used. Signals an error if target already exists.

emacspeak-links: (URL)
Launch links on specified URL in a new terminal.

emacspeak-lynx: (URL)
Launch lynx on specified URL in a new terminal.

emacspeak-next-frame: ()
<control right>

Move to next frame.

emacspeak-previous-frame: ()
<control left>

Move to next frame.

emacspeak-root: (&optional CD)
control e control r

Start a root shell or switch to one that already exists. Optional interactive prefix arg `cd' executes cd default-directory after switching.

emacspeak-select-this-buffer-next-display: ()
control e <control right>

Select this buffer as displayed in a `next' frame. See documentation for command `emacspeak-select-this-buffer-other-window-display' for the meaning of `next'.

emacspeak-select-this-buffer-other-window-display: (&optional ARG)
Switch to this buffer as displayed in a different frame. Emacs allows you to display the same buffer in multiple windows or frames. These different windows can display different portions of the buffer. This is equivalent to leaving a book open at places at once. This command allows you to move to the places where you have left the book open. The number used to invoke this command specifies which of the displays you wish to select. Typically you will have two or at most three such displays open. The current display is 0, the next is 1, and so on. Optional argument ARG specifies the display to select.

emacspeak-select-this-buffer-previous-display: ()
control e <control left>

Select this buffer as displayed in a `previous' window. See documentation for command `emacspeak-select-this-buffer-other-window-display' for the meaning of `previous'.

emacspeak-show-personality-at-point: ()
control e meta v

Show value of property personality at point.

emacspeak-show-property-at-point: (&optional PROPERTY)
control e meta p

Show value of PROPERTY at point. If optional arg property is not supplied, read it interactively. Provides completion based on properties that are of interest. If no property is set, show a message and exit.

emacspeak-skip-blank-lines-backward: ()
<shift up>

Move backward across blank lines. The line under point is then spoken. Signals beginning of buffer.

emacspeak-skip-blank-lines-forward: ()
<shift down>

Move forward across blank lines. The line under point is then spoken. Signals end of buffer.

emacspeak-speak-browse-linux-howto: (HOWTO)
control e cap H

Browse a Linux Howto file. We cleanup underlining, and set up outline mode correctly.

emacspeak-speak-hostname: ()
control e meta h

Speak host name.

emacspeak-speak-load-directory-settings: ()
Load a directory specific Emacspeak settings file. This is typically used to load up settings that are specific to an electronic book consisting of many files in the same directory.

emacspeak-speak-popup-messages: ()
control h cap M

Pop up messages buffer. If it is already selected then hide it and try to restore previous window configuration.

emacspeak-speak-run-shell-command: (COMMAND &optional AS-ROOT)
control e !

Invoke shell COMMAND and display its output as a table. The results are placed in a buffer in Emacspeak's table browsing mode. Optional interactive prefix arg as-root runs the command as root (not yet implemented). Use this for running shell commands that produce tabulated output. This command should be used for shell commands that produce tabulated output that works with Emacspeak's table recognizer. Verify this first by running the command in a shell and executing command `emacspeak-table-display-table-in-region' normally bound to C-e TAB.

emacspeak-speak-show-active-network-interfaces: (&optional ADDRESS)
control e cap I

Shows all active network interfaces in the echo area. With interactive prefix argument ADDRESS it prompts for a specific interface and shows its address. The address is also copied to the kill ring for convenient yanking.

emacspeak-speak-show-memory-used: ()
Convenience command to view state of memory used in this session so far.

emacspeak-speak-telephone-directory: (&optional EDIT)
Lookup and display a phone number. With prefix arg, opens the phone book for editting.

emacspeak-speak-this-buffer-next-display: ()
control e <right>

Speak this buffer as displayed in a `previous' window. See documentation for command `emacspeak-speak-this-buffer-other-window-display' for the meaning of `next'.

emacspeak-speak-this-buffer-other-window-display: (&optional ARG)
control e /

Speak this buffer as displayed in a different frame. Emacs allows you to display the same buffer in multiple windows or frames. These different windows can display different portions of the buffer. This is equivalent to leaving a book open at places at once. This command allows you to listen to the places where you have left the book open. The number used to invoke this command specifies which of the displays you wish to speak. Typically you will have two or at most three such displays open. The current display is 0, the next is 1, and so on. Optional argument ARG specifies the display to speak.

emacspeak-speak-this-buffer-previous-display: ()
control e <left>

Speak this buffer as displayed in a `previous' window. See documentation for command `emacspeak-speak-this-buffer-other-window-display' for the meaning of `previous'.

emacspeak-sudo: (COMMAND)
SUDo command --run command as super user.

emacspeak-switch-to-previous-buffer: ()
Switch to most recently used interesting buffer.

emacspeak-symlink-current-file: ()
control e meta s

Link (symbolic link) file visited in current buffer to new location. Prompts for the new location and preserves modification time when linking. If location is a directory, the file is copied to that directory under its current name ; if location names a file in an existing directory, the specified name is used. Signals an error if target already exists.

emacspeak-view-emacspeak-doc: ()
control e cap D

Display a summary of all Emacspeak commands.

emacspeak-view-emacspeak-faq: ()
control e cap F

Browse the Emacspeak FAQ.

emacspeak-view-emacspeak-news: ()
control e cap N

Display info on recent change to Emacspeak.

emacspeak-view-emacspeak-tips: ()
control e cap T

Browse Emacspeak productivity tips.

emacspeak-wizards-browse-url-with-style: (STYLE URL)
Browse URL with specified XSL style.

emacspeak-wizards-count-slides-in-region: ()
Count slides starting from point.

emacspeak-wizards-finder-find: (DIRECTORY)
Run find-dired on specified switches after prompting for the directory to where find is to be launched.

emacspeak-wizards-finder-mode: ()
Emacspeak Finder

This mode runs the hook `emacspeak-wizards-finder-mode-hook', as the final step during initialization.

key binding --- -------

emacspeak-wizards-fix-read-only-text: (START END)
Nuke read-only property on text range.

emacspeak-wizards-generate-finder: ()
Generate a widget-enabled finder wizard.

emacspeak-wizards-get-table-content-from-file: (TASK FILE DEPTH COUNT)
Extract table specified by depth and count from HTML content at file. Extracted content is placed as a csv file in task.csv.

emacspeak-wizards-get-table-content-from-url: (TASK URL DEPTH COUNT)
Extract table specified by depth and count from HTML content at URL. Extracted content is placed as a csv file in task.csv.

emacspeak-wizards-google-hits: ()
Filter Google results after performing search to show just the hits.

emacspeak-wizards-how-many-matches: (PREFIX)
If you define a file local variable called `emacspeak-occur-pattern' that holds a regular expression that matches lines of interest, you can use this command to conveniently run `how-many'to count matching header lines. With interactive prefix arg, prompts for and remembers the file local pattern.

emacspeak-wizards-occur-header-lines: (PREFIX)
If you define a file local variable called `emacspeak-occur-pattern' that holds a regular expression that matches header lines, you can use this command to conveniently run `occur' to find matching header lines. With prefix arg, prompts for and sets value of the file local pattern.

emacspeak-wizards-portfolio-quotes: ()
Bring up detailed stock quotes for portfolio specified by emacspeak-websearch-personal-portfolio.

emacspeak-wizards-ppt-display: ()
Called to set up preview of an PPT file. Assumes we are in a buffer visiting a .ppt file. Previews those contents as HTML and nukes the buffer visiting the ppt file.

emacspeak-wizards-ppt-mode: ()
Major mode for browsing PPT slides.

PPT files are converted to HTML and previewed using W3.

In addition to any hooks its parent mode `text-mode' might have run, this mode runs the hook `emacspeak-wizards-ppt-mode-hook', as the final step during initialization.

key binding --- -------

emacspeak-wizards-rpm-query-in-dired: ()
Run rpm -qi on current dired entry.

emacspeak-wizards-shell-toggle: ()
control e <f11>

Switch to the shell buffer and cd to the directory of the current buffer.

emacspeak-wizards-show-environment-vvariable: (V)
Display value of specified environment variable.

emacspeak-wizards-show-list-variable: (VAR)
Convenience command to view Emacs variables that are long lists. Prompts for a variable name and displays its value in a separate buffer. Lists are displayed one element per line. Argument VAR specifies variable whose value is to be displayed.

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.

emacspeak-wizards-spot-words: (EXT WORD)
Searches recursively in all files with extension `ext' for `word' and displays hits in a compilation buffer.

emacspeak-wizards-squeeze-blanks: (START END)
Squeeze multiple blank lines in current buffer.

emacspeak-wizards-use-w3-or-w3m: ()
Alternates between using W3 and W3M for browse-url.

emacspeak-wizards-xl-display: ()
Called to set up preview of an XL file. Assumes we are in a buffer visiting a .xls file. Previews those contents as HTML and nukes the buffer visiting the xls file.

emacspeak-wizards-xl-mode: ()
Major mode for browsing XL spreadsheets.

XL Sheets are converted to HTML and previewed using W3.

In addition to any hooks its parent mode `text-mode' might have run, this mode runs the hook `emacspeak-wizards-xl-mode-hook', as the final step during initialization.

key binding --- -------


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10.66 emacspeak-xml-shell

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module emacspeak-xml-shell.

emacspeak-xml-shell: (SYSTEM-ID)
Start Xml-Shell on contents of system-id.

emacspeak-xml-shell-browse-current: ()
Display current node.

emacspeak-xml-shell-browse-result: (XPATH)
Display XPath and display its result using W3.

This function is advised.

Before-advice `emacspeak-auto': Automatically defined advice to speak interactive prompts.

emacspeak-xml-shell-goto-children: ()
Navigate down to the children of current node.

emacspeak-xml-shell-goto-next-child: ()
Navigate forward to the next child of current node.

emacspeak-xml-shell-goto-parent: ()
Navigate up to the parent of current node.

emacspeak-xml-shell-goto-previous-child: ()
Navigate backward to the previous child of current node.

emacspeak-xml-shell-mode: ()
XML Shell

Interactive XML browser. key binding --- -------

C-c Prefix Command <down> emacspeak-xml-shell-goto-children <up> emacspeak-xml-shell-goto-parent <right> emacspeak-xml-shell-goto-next-child <left> emacspeak-xml-shell-goto-previous-child

C-c v emacspeak-xml-shell-browse-current C-c C-v emacspeak-xml-shell-browse-result

In addition to any hooks its parent mode `comint-mode' might have run, this mode runs the hook `emacspeak-xml-shell-mode-hook', as the final step during initialization.

Automatically generated documentation for commands defined in module nil.

emacspeak-m-player: ()
control e :

Emacspeak media player access.

emacspeak-speak-current-field: ()
control e .

Speak current field. A field is defined by Emacs 21.

emacspeak-w3-google-on-this-site: ()
Perform a google search restricted to the current WWW site.


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11. Acknowledgements.

Thanks.


[ < ] [ > ]   [ << ] [ Up ] [ >> ]         [Top] [Contents] [Index] [ ? ]

12. Concept Index

Jump to:   C   L   S   T   W  

Index Entry Section

C
character echo5.4.1 Character, Word And Line Echo.

L
line echo5.4.1 Character, Word And Line Echo.

S
speech settings5.4 Speech System Commands
speech system5.4 Speech System Commands

T
tts5.4 Speech System Commands

W
word echo5.4.1 Character, Word And Line Echo.

Jump to:   C   L   S   T   W  


[ < ] [ > ]   [ << ] [ Up ] [ >> ]         [Top] [Contents] [Index] [ ? ]

13. Key Index

Jump to:   C  

Index Entry Section

C
C-c (9.1 Char Sub-mode of Term Mode
C-c )9.1 Char Sub-mode of Term Mode
C-c 09.1 Char Sub-mode of Term Mode
C-c 19.1 Char Sub-mode of Term Mode
C-c C-\9.2 Line Sub-mode of Term Mode
C-c C-a9.2 Line Sub-mode of Term Mode
C-c C-c9.1 Char Sub-mode of Term Mode
C-c C-c9.2 Line Sub-mode of Term Mode
C-c C-d9.1 Char Sub-mode of Term Mode
C-c C-d9.2 Line Sub-mode of Term Mode
C-c C-f9.1 Char Sub-mode of Term Mode
C-c C-j9.1 Char Sub-mode of Term Mode
C-c C-k9.2 Line Sub-mode of Term Mode
C-c C-u9.2 Line Sub-mode of Term Mode
C-c C-w9.2 Line Sub-mode of Term Mode
C-c C-x C-c9.1 Char Sub-mode of Term Mode
C-c C-z9.2 Line Sub-mode of Term Mode
C-c e9.1 Char Sub-mode of Term Mode
C-c k9.1 Char Sub-mode of Term Mode
C-c o9.1 Char Sub-mode of Term Mode

Jump to:   C  


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Footnotes

(1)

I have now been using Emacspeak under Linux as the only source of speech feedback since 1994.

(2)

Control e is mnemonic for Emacspeak.

(3)

d is mnemonic for Dectalk.


[Top] [Contents] [Index] [ ? ]

Table of Contents


[Top] [Contents] [Index] [ ? ]

Short Table of Contents

1. Copyright
2. Announcing Emacspeak Manual 2nd Edition As An Open Source Project
3. Introduction
4. Installation Instructions
5. Basic Usage.
6. The Emacspeak Audio Desktop.
7. Using Online Help With Emacspeak.
8. Emacs Packages.
Spell Checking
9. Running Terminal Based Applications
10. Emacspeak Commands
11. Acknowledgements.
12. Concept Index
13. Key Index

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About this document

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