'Eye in the Sky' Will Bypass Internet Traffic Jams featured in Cornell Chronicle

'Eye in the Sky' Will Bypass Internet Traffic Jams 
Cornell Chronicle (10/24/14) Bill Steele

A new proposal for using "knowledge planes" to help ease Internet traffic jams will not require extensive upgrades to network hardware.  A team of researchers from Cornell University, the University of Southern California, and the University of Massachusetts says their application will work with tools that are already available in Internet routers.  Called IN-CONTROL (Programmable Inter-Domain Observation and Control), the application will collect information on how networks are organized, and its database will help network operators select the best paths, relay around faults, or avoid untrustworthy networks.

IN-CONTROL will build on ideas from Frenetic, a programming language developed by Cornell professor Nate Foster that enables network programmers to write commands for what they want routers to do without understanding the details of the hardware.  Security mechanisms planned for IN-CONTROL will help keep network information from being exposed.  In addition, the team plans to distribute the database across the Internet for security and scalability.  The researchers say the promise of improved performance should convince network operators to support the plan.

http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/2014/10/eye-sky-will-bypass-internet-traffic-jams

Date Posted: 12/01/2014

Johannes Gehrke was PC Chair of the 2014 ACM Symposium on Cloud Computing

Johannes Gehrke, jointly with Remzi Arpazi-Dousseau, was PC Chair of the 2014 ACM Symposium on Cloud Computing held in Seattle, WA, from November 2 to November 5. The ACM Symposium on Cloud Computing 2014 is the fifth in a new series of symposia that bring together researchers, developers, users, and practitioners interested in cloud computing. SOCC is co-sponsored by the ACM Special Interest Groups on Management of Data (SIGMOD) and on Operating Systems (SIGOPS).

Johannes Gehrke gave a keynote at the 8th Workshop on Large-Scale Distributed Systems (LADIS 2014) held in October 2014, in Cambridge, UK. His keynote was titled "Deferring the Effect of Transactions." 

Date Posted: 12/01/2014

Ken Birman Named 2015 IEEE Fellow

The IEEE Board of Directors, at its November 2014 meeting, elevated Ken Birman to IEEE Fellow, effective January 1st, 2015, with the following citation: for leadership in distributed computing and management of distributed systems. Congrats Ken!

Date Posted: 12/01/2014

Cornell is one of two schools that is advancing to the world finals of the International Collegiate Programming Contest from the Greater NY ACM Regionals.

 

Cornell is one of two schools that is advancing to the world finals of the International Collegiate Programming Contest from the Greater NY ACM Regionals.
Also notable is that, by taking 2nd, 6th, 12th, and 17th place, we had the best average rank of all the schools, from a field of 45 teams.
The members of the Cornell team going on to the finals are Eduardo Ferreira, Rafael Marinheiro, and Victor Reis.  All four teams were coached by ORIE PhD student (and CS minor) Daniel Fleischman, with Walker White serving as team advisor.
 

Schools and average rank
...
Cornell 9.25 (4 teams: 2, 6, 12, 17)
Princeton 10.5 (4 teams: 1, 3, 9, 29)
SUNY-Stonybrook 11 (3 teams: 5, 7, 21)
Yale 13.5 (4 teams: 10, 11, 15, 18)
CUNY 14 (1 team)
Columbia 14.6667 (3 teams: 4, 13, 27)
NYU 19.5 (6 teams)
Poly 25 (2 teams)
Stevens 28 (2 teams)
Cooper 31.6667 (3 teams)
Manhattan 34.3333 (3 teams)
Binghamton 36 (1 team)
Hofstra 36 (2 teams)
SJCNY 37.5 (4 teams)
ECC 43 (1 team)
Mercy 43 (1 team)
NJIT 43 (1 team)

http://www.acmgnyr.org/year2014/standings.shtml

Date Posted: 12/01/2014

Cornell Systems-Industry Workshop Recap

The Cornell CS Systems and Networking group organized a workshop on November 20th. The main goals of the workshop were to increase the visibility of systems and networking research at Cornell and to form better ties with colleagues in industry. The program included presentations by Cornell faculty, a poster and demo session by PhD students and postdocs, and panel discussions with visitors from a number of organizations including Amazon, AT&T, Brocade, Cisco, Dell, Fujitsu, HP, IBM, Microsoft, and MIT Lincoln Labs. Ulfar Erlingsson (PhD '04) closed the workshop with a keynote on "Macaroons: Decentralized Authorization using Cookies with Caveats".

Date Posted: 12/01/2014

M.Eng student Jeremy Feinstein, Serge Belongie, and colleagues at Weill Cornell Medical College received an Honorable Mention award for ART Video at the 2014 meeting of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine

M.Eng student Jeremy Feinstein, Serge Belongie, and colleagues at Weill Cornell Medical College received an Honorable Mention award for ART Video at the 2014 meeting of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine. An interesting tidbit: the project was a collaboration between three Cornell campuses!

3d Sperm Surface Reconstruction -- A Novel Three-Dimensional Apprach to Assessing Sperm Morphology. B. A. Levine, J. Feinstein, Q. V. Neri, D. Goldschlag, S. Belongie, Z. Rosenwaks, G. Palermo

Date Posted: 11/05/2014

MIT Technology Review describes "Tell Me Dave" project, led by PhD students Dipendra K. Misra and Jaeyong Sung and Ashutosh Saxena

MIT Technology Review's "Question of the Week" of October 15, 2014, "Can Humans Benefit from Robots in the Workplace?" had the following description of the "Tell Me Dave" project, led by PhD students Dipendra K. Misra and Jaeyong Sung and Ashutosh Saxena:

Cornell researcher Ashutosh Saxena wants people to be able to use casual language to give robots instructions. At the university's Robot Learning Lab, Saxena is programming robots to know their environment via three-dimensional scanning technology and understand basic commands. Researchers give the example of telling a robot to cook noodles. Normally, that would require a rigid set of instructions covering everything from where the stove is to how to turn it on. If one detail is missing, the robot would be unable to carry out the task. With Saxena's technology, the robot could understand slight variations of the same command, like "take the pot" or "carry the pot," and use visual cues to trace a path to the stove or sink just from seeing its surroundings.

Date Posted: 11/05/2014

Thorsten Joachims gave one of the two invited talks at the 2014 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP)

Thorsten Joachims gave one of the two invited talks at the 2014 Conference on Empirical Methods in Natural Language Processing (EMNLP), one of the top conferences in NLP.  His talk,  "Learning from Rational Behavior", considers how NLP systems can learn from the observable choices that people make when they use language-based systems.


Bo Pang (CUCS Ph.D. '06) was the program co-chair of the conference.

Date Posted: 11/05/2014

CUCS Ph.D. student Joshua Moore, with Thorsten Joachims received the Best Student Paper award at the 2014 International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference (ISMIR)

CUCS Ph.D. student Joshua Moore, together with Thorsten Joachims and Ithaca College professor Douglas Turnbull, received the Best Student Paper award at the 2014 International Society for Music Information Retrieval Conference (ISMIR) for the paper "Taste Space Versus the World". Using the Million Musical Tweets Dataset, they "distill information about cultural and geographical differences in listening patterns into spatial representations."

Date Posted: 11/05/2014

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